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Polluting waste incinerator near local community in East Liverpool.

Incineration

Society continues to generate more waste and to change this alarming trend; strong political and industrial measures are urgently needed.

Despite what industry and governments would like people to believe,incineration is not a solution to the world's waste problems, but partof the problem.

Incinerators may reduce the volume of solid waste, but they do notdispose of the toxic substances contained in the waste. They create thelargest source of dioxins, which is one of the most toxic chemicalsknown to science.

Incinerators emit a wide range of pollutants in their stack gases,ashes and other residues. The filters used to clean incinerator stackgases produce solid and liquid toxic wastes, which also need to bedisposed.

The only way to improve the situation is to avoid toxic waste production by improving our products and processes.

Public opposition to incineration isgrowing worldwide. People are recognising that there is no place forthe incineration of waste in a sustainable society.

The latest updates

 

Re-source: market alternatives to ancient forest destruction, part three of three

Publication | 1 November, 1999 at 0:00

Re-Source: Market Alternatives to Ancient Forest Destruction is the second in a series of Greenpeace reports aimed at the corporate consumers of forest products to help them end their role in ancient forest destruction.The first report, Buying...

Re-source: market alternatives to ancient forest destruction, part two of three

Publication | 1 November, 1999 at 0:00

Re-Source: Market Alternatives to Ancient Forest Destruction is the second in a series of Greenpeace reports aimed at the corporate consumers of forest products to help them end their role in ancient forest destruction.The first report, Buying...

Re-Source: market alternatives to ancient forest destruction, part one of three

Publication | 1 November, 1999 at 0:00

Re-Source: Market Alternatives to Ancient Forest Destruction is the second in a series of Greenpeace reports aimed at the corporate consumers of forest products to help them end their role in ancient forest destruction.The first report, Buying...

Polar bears in Churchill in Manitoba

Image | 1 November, 1999 at 0:00

Polar bears in Churchill in Manitoba, Canada have to be tranquillised then airlifted north in order to access their natural habitat as the sea ice is returning later and later after the summer months.

Polar bears in Churchill in Manitoba

Image | 1 November, 1999 at 0:00

Polar bears in Churchill in Manitoba, Canada have to be tranquillised then airlifted north in order to access their natural habitat as the snow is returning later and later after the summer months.

Polar bears in Churchill in Manitoba

Image | 1 November, 1999 at 0:00

Polar bears in Churchill in Manitoba, Canada have to be tranquillised then airlifted north in order to access their natural habitat as the snow is returning later and later after the summer months.

Greenpeace gathering vegetation adjacent

Image | 4 October, 1999 at 1:00

Greenpeace gathering vegetation adjacent the site of nuclear accident at Tokaimura.

Greenpeace protest at Pacific Pintail arrival

Image | 1 October, 1999 at 1:00

Greenpeace protest at Pacific Pintail arrival carrying MOX plutonium.

Pacific Pintail carrying MOX plutonium arrives

Image | 1 October, 1999 at 1:00

Pacific Pintail carrying MOX plutonium arrives at Takahama nuclear plant.

Phthalates in PVC Medical Products From 12 Countries

Publication | 1 October, 1999 at 0:00

A Greenpeace investigation revealed the widespread presence of DEHP1, a toxic phthalatesoftener, in a sample of 46 common PVC medical products from twelve countries.

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