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Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

Grrrowd: How much justice can we crowdsource?

Blog entry by Brian Fitzgerald | 24 December, 2014

Take a crowd, add a Grrrowl, and what have you got? A Grrrowd. Think of it as a Kickstarter or Indiegogo for justice. Citizens band together to fund not just good causes, but good cases: legal action that can bring down polluting...

Belgium’s government is Electrabel’s slave

Blog entry by Rianne Teule | 22 December, 2014

The Belgian government is kept on a leash by Electrabel. On Friday 19 December, the federal government decided to extend the lifetime of nuclear reactors Doel 1 and 2 by ten years. Only one party benefits from this decision:...

Golden Agri Resources

Publication | 22 December, 2014 at 14:00

When Golden Agri-Resources (GAR) announced its ambitious Forest Conservation Policy (FCP) in early 2011, it aimed to position the company as an industry leader. GAR has collaborated with The Forest Trust to implement its FCP and to move towards...

One step at a time we are getting closer to a GE-free Europe

Blog entry by Luís Ferreirim | 22 December, 2014

When the year comes to a close it's often a time for balances, and even if progress is slow it's good to stop for a moment to take stock. Take genetically engineered (GE) crops (also referred to as GMOs), for example. In Europe,...

10 reasons why reindeer are the coolest animals in the Arctic

Blog entry by Trillia Fidei | 20 December, 2014 2 comments

1. Their antlers are velvety fingerprints. Reindeer antlers are bony appendages that grow every year. The antlers grow quickly – up to 2 cm per day – in a blood-supply-rich material called "velvet", which is exactly what it...

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