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Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

Happy nuclear free birthday to the people of Japan

Blog entry by Kendra Ulrich | 15 September, 2014 7 comments

Every birthday is special – but today Japan is celebrating something unique. Japan has been nuclear-free for one year. Nuclear-free – a phrase that in its simplicity carries a devastating message for the worldwide nuclear industry,...

Belgium’s nuclear reactors are phasing themselves out

Blog entry by Eloi Glorieux | 13 September, 2014 2 comments

On Wednesday 10 September 2014 , Greenpeace activists in Brussels visited the politicians currently negotiating a new federal governmental agreement about the country's nuclear power supply. We were there to make it clear that...

FSC makes big strides

Blog entry by Judy Rodrigues | 12 September, 2014

This week, Greenpeace has been squirreled away in meetings with members of the FSC's General Assembly, the membership body that makes decisions about how FSC is governed. To be frank, we've been pretty critical of FSC over the last...

An apple a day keeps the pesticides away

Blog entry by Federica Ferrario | 12 September, 2014

The fields around Malles in the heart of the Venosta Valley in northern Italy are right now surrounded by thousands of yellow and red apples, ready to be harvested. These apples – the real "gold" of this area – will soon be produced...

The Arctic is worth fighting for

Blog entry by Yeb Saño | 11 September, 2014 1 comment

As I witness with my own eyes the sublime and spectacular beauty of the Arctic, I realize that we live on a deeply interconnected planet. What happens all over the world affects this region in seriously profound and intricate ways.

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