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Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

The latest World Nuclear Industry Status Report: more bad news for nuclear power,...

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 30 July, 2014 8 comments

"The nuclear share in the world’s power generation declined steadily from a historic peak of 17.6 percent in 1996 to 10.8 percent in 2013."  The sun is setting on nuclear power This year’s numbers for the nuclear industry are...

Cargill's palm oil commitment

Blog entry by Joao Talocchi | 30 July, 2014

Cargill, the largest importer of palm oil into the United States, one of the world's largest commodities traders and a palm oil producer itself, made a pledge to break the link between its palm oil and deforestation, peat destruction...

Rainbow Warrior in Venice

Image | 28 July, 2014 at 16:55

The Greenpeace ship, Rainbow Warrior, sails past Venice and the Piazza San Marco bearing the message "Save the Climate, There is no Planet B". Venice is one of the low-lying cities identified by scientists to be under severe threat from sea level...

Venice is at the heart of climate change debate

Blog entry by Luca Iacoboni | 28 July, 2014 1 comment

Today we are in Venice with the Rainbow Warrior. Venice – which is already fighting sea level rise – is a city which is extremely threatened by climate change. For the people who live there and the millions who visit every year, we...

Gil Scott-Heron's anti-nuclear song speaks to us across 40 years

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 28 July, 2014 1 comment

There aren't many songs about nuclear power, but a very fine one by Gil Scott-Heron shows us things never change. As we've discussed many times on the Nuclear Reaction blog, one of the defining characteristics of the nuclear...

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