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Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

ROSATOM – the risks of nuclear politics

Blog entry by Jan Haverkamp | 21 October, 2014

The Russian state nuclear corporation, Rosatom, is aggressively pursuing export contracts throughout the world – pledging to offer an ideal all-inclusive solution to the huge problems and risks associated with nuclear reactors Even...

Global Wind Energy Outlook

Publication | 21 October, 2014 at 4:00

Published by the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) and Greenpeace International, the Global Wind Energy Outlook is a biennial report that examines the status and future prospects of wind power.

Blowin' in the wind

Blog entry by Sven Teske | 21 October, 2014 2 comments

Wind power has a pivotal role to play in the world's energy supply over the next few years. By providing huge amounts of clean, affordable power, it can buy us time in the fight against global warming while revolutions in energy...

7 inspiring stories of communities taking action for climate

Blog entry by Helena Meresman | 17 October, 2014 4 comments

Stories of communities taking action for the climate and refusing to accept the plans of polluting fossil fuel companies are happening more and more. Here are just a few inspiring climate acts of courage taken by doctors, villagers,...

Change your food, change the world: 5 ways to bite away at your food footprint

Blog entry by Rashini Suriyaarachchi | 16 October, 2014 2 comments

Between production, packaging, transport and cooking, the things we eat can have a massive impact on the earth. Luckily, they're also some of the easiest habits to change. Here are the first steps to going on an environmentally-friendly...

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