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Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

Historic US-China deal marks the beginning of the end of China’s coal chapter

Blog entry by Li Shuo | 12 November, 2014 4 comments

Today could be the most important day so far this century in climate and energy politics. China and United States have come to an historic agreement , negotiated privately over a period of months, that represents China's first...

Oh, we get by with a little help from our friends (all 2 million of them)

Blog entry by Chiara Milford | 12 November, 2014 9 comments

Thank you to our 2,000,000 Facebook fans! Over the last six years together we’ve done some pretty awesome things together. We've shared some good times and some rough times. Thanks to you there's been a lot more of the good. Here...

Sadness turns to joy as Turkish coal project halted

Blog entry by Deniz Bayram | 12 November, 2014 3 comments

The community of the western Turkish village of Yirca has experienced a rollercoaster of sadness and elation in recent days, winning an important court battle against a coal project but losing 6,000 valuable olive trees. Just...

A polar bear nursery, a Russian oil company and one of the most beautiful islands on...

Blog entry by Maria Favorsky | 12 November, 2014

Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean is a distant land of polar bears and whales, northern lights and shining ice. It's also a nature reserve and one of only two UNESCO Natural Heritage sites in the Arctic. It should be the most peaceful...

Contamination from GE crops does happen: nearly 400 incidents since GE crops were...

Blog entry by Janet Cotter and Becky Price | 12 November, 2014 1 comment

Genetically engineered (GE - also called genetically modified, GM) crops raise many concerns, particularly for the environment. One of the main concerns for consumers, farmers and traders is contamination from GE crops. Now, a...

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