This page has been archived, and may no longer be up to date

Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

The Dirtiest Ark

Blog entry by Arin de Hoog | 4 July, 2014

People tend to forget that coal’s reach goes far beyond the place where it is mined. How its harmful emissions don’t just reach across the sky, but its product also moves across our oceans and seas. The World Coal Association ...

How tiny plastic people protested around the world

Blog entry by Sara Ayech | 3 July, 2014

The news of LEGO's cosy relationship with Shell has led to tiny protests erupting around the world. Famous national and international landmarks have been festooned with banners as the streets resounded the stamp of little plastic...

Boiling Point: Multiple Crises and the Democratic Deficit

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 2 July, 2014

Kumi Naidoo, the International Executive Director of Greenpeace, has been a leader in human rights, social justice, and environmental activism for over three decades. Allen White of the Tellus Institute interviews Naidoo about how to...

It's time for LEGO to block Shell

Blog entry by Ian Duff | 1 July, 2014 5 comments

Imagine you're eight years old and picture the Arctic. There are no oil rigs, no industrial shipping and no politicians fighting over it. It's just an endless sparkling expanse of sea and ice, populated by brave scientific explorers...

Pushing for transparency in Congo Basin palm oil

Blog entry by Amy Moas | 27 June, 2014

The global palm oil industry is at a critical juncture. In 2012 we published a report that outlined how Africa is a new frontier for industrial palm oil production . This may bring much needed development to the continent, but it...

11 - 15 of 13207 results.