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Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

7 Green ways to watch the World Cup

Blog entry by Tom Dowdall | 26 June, 2014

So like most of us, you also couldn't make it to Brazil to enjoy the global football fest in person? Well, take comfort in the fact that you are not contributing to the carbon emissions of traveling to Brazil to catch the games!

A Brief History of Europe's Energy Troubles

Feature story | 25 June, 2014 at 11:00

The Ukraine crisis currently shows just how dependent Europe is, especially on Russian oil and gas. The EU spent a total of EUR 421 billion on energy imports in 2012.

Support for high seas protection grows stronger despite USA

Blog entry by Rachel Pearlin | 20 June, 2014

This is my first time in New York, but neither the soaring temperatures, the rush nor the crowds seem to faze me, this is nothing compared to India! This is also my first time at a UN meeting, joining experts from all over the world as...

Arctic Sanctuary

Publication | 19 June, 2014 at 15:30

Arctic coastal states are keen to lay claim on the valuable resources found beyond their national boundaries, and they have all submitted applications to extend their polar seabeds. Governments and industry see the opening of the Arctic as yet...

When it comes to nuclear power, small isn't beautiful. Or safe or cheap.

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 19 June, 2014 8 comments

Not beautiful, safe or cheap: a message to the United States, where the Obama administration has pledged to waste money financing the Small Modular Reactor (SMR). SMRs are supposed to be small and prefab – constructed from parts...

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