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Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

A magic moment: Tetley starts a journey towards ecological tea

Blog entry by Melissa Shinn | 1 October, 2014 1 comment

Ever have a moment when you feel like something extraordinary just happened, a small step that might start something really big? Last Monday I had one of those moments. I read an announcement by the makers of Tetley tea in India...

A leader, a polar bear, and the shock of recognition

Blog entry by Anote Tong, President of Kiribati | 30 September, 2014

We had only been on the rock next to the melting Nordenskiöld glacier for a few minutes when I looked up and saw a white furry head looking down at me from a cliff 60 meters away. Our polar guide, who had scouted the area in...

"It's the Devil's excrement" - Where fossil fuels lurk, corruption creeps

Blog entry by Marina Lou | 29 September, 2014 1 comment

When it comes to resource extraction and the political process  — the issue is a global one. Have a look at some of the recent coal- ruption stories that have been breaking all around the world. Australia In the state of New...

That moment in New York City when the game of the climate movement changed

Blog entry by Martin Kaiser | 27 September, 2014

Who anticipated a turn-out like this? The largest political march in the US for over decade and it all took place in New York, home of the world's largest stock exchange, headquarters of international financial institutions and both...

Forests need laws, not loopholes

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 25 September, 2014 2 comments

Sitting in the towering United Nation's building on New York's east side, it might be hard for world leaders to picture a destroyed forest, but I know just how depressing the site is. In Indonesia, and elsewhere, we've seen vast tracks...

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