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Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

Gil Scott-Heron's anti-nuclear song speaks to us across 40 years

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 28 July, 2014 1 comment

There aren't many songs about nuclear power, but a very fine one by Gil Scott-Heron shows us things never change. As we've discussed many times on the Nuclear Reaction blog, one of the defining characteristics of the nuclear...

The nuclear industry isn't planning for the next unthinkable catastrophe

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 25 July, 2014 2 comments

A new report from the US National Academy of Sciences says not enough is being done to prevent worst case scenario nuclear accidents. We agree. A year after the Fukushima nuclear disaster began in March 2011… … the Max Planck...

China's planned coal-to-gas plants to emit over one billion tons of CO2

Feature story | 25 July, 2014 at 17:00

There could be 50 coal-to-gas projects operational within the next decade, producing 225 billion cubic metres of synthetic natural gas [SNG] per year, if all of the planned ones go ahead, according to comprehensive new research by Greenpeace China.

Dear LEGO employees,

Blog entry by Ian Duff | 22 July, 2014 1 comment

Hi. My name is Ian and I'm a campaigner with Greenpeace. I'm also a new dad and a big fan of LEGO. She's a little young now, but I know that in a few years my baby girl will be building her own dreams out of your colourful little...

One of life's hard-to-believe moments: Drilling holes in a nuclear reactor

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 22 July, 2014 6 comments

Switzerland's cheese is famous for its holes and now one of the country's nuclear reactors is infamous for the same reason. I don't know about you but I'm terrible at home improvements and DIY. Ask me to hang a picture on the...

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