This page has been archived, and may no longer be up to date

Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

When it comes to nuclear power, small isn't beautiful. Or safe or cheap.

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 19 June, 2014 8 comments

Not beautiful, safe or cheap: a message to the United States, where the Obama administration has pledged to waste money financing the Small Modular Reactor (SMR). SMRs are supposed to be small and prefab – constructed from parts...

Ocean action in Washington – but High Seas ignored

Blog entry by Daniel Mittler | 17 June, 2014

US Secretary of State, John Kerry, clearly cares about the ocean. He grew up with the sea and backed many progressive ocean policies while in the US Senate. You could feel that emotional connection at the OurOcean conference , which...

Farewell to Uli

Blog entry by Gerd Leipold | 17 June, 2014 7 comments

Ulrich von Eitzen, Operations Director of Greenpeace International from 2004 until 2013 and then a senior advisor to the Executive Director’s Office, finally lost his battle with cancer last Thursday, 12 June, 2014. The way he...

Water: A Lake with a Thousand Faces

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 16 June, 2014

I live on a lakeshore. It's face changes not only day-to-day, but moment to moment, menacing and dark, then ethereal with silver light dancing everywhere, then solemn again, like glass, then lively with trout feeding at the surface.

Statement on foreign currency exchange losses

Feature story | 15 June, 2014 at 23:16

Greenpeace International understands that supporters and donors will rightly be surprised and disappointed by the loss of 3.8 million euros as a consequence of foreign currency exchange management contracts currently being reported by the media.

41 - 45 of 13224 results.