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Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

Dear LEGO employees,

Blog entry by Ian Duff | 22 July, 2014

Hi. My name is Ian and I'm a campaigner with Greenpeace. I'm also a new dad and a big fan of LEGO. She's a little young now, but I know that in a few years my baby girl will be building her own dreams out of your colourful little...

One of life’s hard-to-believe moments: Drilling holes in a nuclear reactor

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 22 July, 2014 5 comments

Switzerland 's cheese is famous for its holes and now one of the country's nuclear reactors is infamous for the same reason. I don't know about you but I'm terrible at home improvements and DIY. Ask me to hang a picture on...

Power from the Sun: A new life for Dharnai, India

Blog entry by Neha Khator and Ruhie Kumar | 20 July, 2014 2 comments

In this world where we seem surrounded by news of gloom and doom, we don't often hear stories of positive change. But here is one: a story of a village that has unshackled itself from darkness, after 30 years of having its energy...

Back to the future with Japan's nuclear village

Blog entry by Kazue Suzuki | 16 July, 2014 1 comment

The decision of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) to approve the draft assessment for the two Sendai nuclear reactors in Kyushu is a clear and dangerous signal that Japan's nuclear village – industry, regulators and government –...

Costa, we are watching you

Blog entry by Giorgia Monti | 15 July, 2014

As the wrecked Italian cruise ship Costa Concordia is towed to its home port of Genoa, Greenpeace Italy and the Italian environmental group Legambiente will monitor for pollution and spills. We're particularly concerned about impacts...

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