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Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

If it wasn't for us, the oil companies would be totally out of control

Blog entry by Laura Kenyon | 26 August, 2014

Come and spend two weeks traveling the oil fields of the Komi Republic and you can see two hundred different places contaminated in one way or another by the oil industry: rivers, swamps, forests, and green fields. Many of the...

Don't forget about the people

Blog entry by Madalina Preda | 26 August, 2014 2 comments

This past weekend thousands of people joined hands to form an eight-kilometer Human Chain across the border of Germany and Poland to protest against lignite coal mining in the area. 30 different nationalities traveled from cities...

Communities in conflict: Lignite mining on the Poland-Germany border

Blog entry by Helle Abelvik-Lawson | 26 August, 2014

Janina Dziadez's farmhouse in the village of Biecz is surrounded by old red-brick barns and the 79 year old's immaculately-kept garden. She moved here with her husband in 1954 and the farm houses four generations of the matriarch's...

Nuclear power: reliably unreliable

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 26 August, 2014 15 comments

With wind power filling the energy gap left by shutdown nuclear reactors in the UK , and police investigating allegations of sabotage at a reactor in Belgium , the myth of "reliable" nuclear energy is being exposed like never...

FSC puts business interests first

Blog entry by Asti Roesle | 26 August, 2014

As a member of the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) in Switzerland, as well as a Greenpeace campaigner focused on doing everything I can to protect our planet's last untouched forests, I am alarmed that FSC has already decided to...

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