How six women did something incredible to save the Arctic

Video | 22 July, 2013

At 4:20 in the morning, 11 July 2013, six climbers began a 15 hour climb of Europe's tallest building, the Shard, to send a message to the headquarters of oil giant Shell. This behind-the-scenes film captures the months-long build-up to the climb and the first hair-raising moments when things didn't go to plan.

The climb was live-streamed from the activists' helmet cameras in a ground-breaking digital campaign roll-out that represented a "new paradigm", according to leading PR advisor Solitaire Townsend. A live audio commentary overlaid the footage for the whole day -- with Greenpeace presenters interviewing experts and taking comments from as far away as New Zealand (Xena actress Lucy Lawless called in to the show). #Iceclimb trended globally on Twitter and at one point six of the top ten trending topics in the UK were about the protest.

The climbers are: Ali Garrigan, 27 (UK), Liesbeth Deddens, 31 (Netherlands), Sabine Huyghe, 33 (Belgium), Sandra Lamborn, 29 (Sweden), Victoria Henry, 32 (Canada), Wiola Smul, 23 (Poland).

What will you do to save the Arctic? http://savethearctic.org

At 4:20am, 11 July 2013, six climbers began a 15 hour climb of Europe's tallest building, the Shard, to send a message to oil giant Shell. This behind-the-scenes film captures the months-long build-up to the climb and the first hair-raising moments when things didn't go to plan.

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