The world is moving ahead without Trump - but not as fast and decisively as needed.

Another round of climate negotiations is over. And, like last year, President Trump has failed to stop the global climate talks from moving forward. Indeed, his announcement to withdraw from the Paris Agreement has brought even louder and clearer voices for climate leadership from the United States to Bonn. Civil society, cities, governors and some businesses have shown the true face of America here, exposing how Trump and his regressive fossil fuel agenda does not stand for the majority of Americans. America is still in - and Americans are rising up for climate action.

We have also seen some positive announcements in recent days: a new alliance pledging to phase out coal was formed; Europe's biggest coal port, Rotterdam, decided to phase out coal to deliver on the Paris Agreement and the Pacific Island Development Forum nations signed on to the Lofoten Declaration, that calls for a just transition - a managed phase out of fossil fuels. We have also seen the largest wealth fund in the world announcing that they want to divest from oil and gas.  

Overall, though, there has been too much talk and not enough action. France, Germany and China have claimed to be leaders here - but Chancellor Merkel embarrassed herself on the global stage when she failed to commit to a coal phase-out; French President Macron has put off the phase out of nuclear, which will slow down the urgently needed French energy revolution. And China, too, has seen emissions rise this year again after three years of coal consumption decline (though that may turn out to be a temporary blip).

In a year that has seen ever more devastating climate impacts, that is simply not good enough. This conference was led by Fiji - the first time a climate summit was led by a Pacific island nation. The Pacific has been dealing with the devastating impacts of climate change for years - and this meeting did not deliver as much hope and support to them as would have been warranted and just.

One of my highlights of the last two weeks has been watching our Fijian volunteers, Alisi Nacewa and Samu Kuridrani, interview people about climate change - and these, at times crazy, negotiations. I encourage you to watch their Kava Chats. It's for the home of people like Alisi and Samu that we are fighting for.

We will not win against dangerous climate change unless we work together across sectors and movements. This week, we held a joint event with the International Trade Union Confederation, discussing how we can unite to advance a just transition - and make climate action work for workers and the planet alike. We also brought together activists from climate impacted communities with National Human Rights institutions. We hope that many of them will follow the example of the Philippine Human Rights Commission, that is investigating the human rights impacts of 47 carbon producers, including ExxonMobil, Shell, BP, Chevron, and Total.

There is an encouraging wave of legal action against polluters. This week a German court accepted a case brought by a Peruvian farmer against energy giant RWE. RWE, he argues, must share in the cost of protecting his hometown Huaraz from a swollen glacier lake at risk of overflowing from melting snow and ice. And our legal colleagues have been in a courtroom in Norway making the case that additional oil drilling in the Arctic not only undermines the Paris Agreement but actually undermines the Norwegian constitution. Add your name to this case of The People vs Arctic Oil here.

We will hold polluters accountable for their impacts. We will continue to push for quicker climate action so that even more devastation is prevented. The world is moving ahead. But we are in a race against time. And we need governments and corporations to move faster than we have seen them doing over the last two weeks here in Bonn.

Daniel Mittler is the Political Director of Greenpeace International