CO2 levels rising faster than predicted - Greenpeace response

Press release - October 23, 2007
Responding to findings by the Global Carbon Project, published in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences” this week, that atmospheric CO2 levels have risen 35% faster than expected since 2000, Gavin Edwards, Head of Climate at Greenpeace International said:“Today’s extremely worrying findings add to the overwhelming scientific evidence of the intensity of the climate crisis. We have no more time to waste in tackling climate change.

"The science is clear. The solutions are clear. The only thing left unclear is whether world governments will rise to the challenge of tackling climate change when they meet in Bali for UN climate negotiations later this year."

World governments will meet in Bali, Indonesia this December to agree a framework for the next two years of the Kyoto Protocol, and must agree a clear mandate to secure binding emissions cuts that the science says is needed to avoid climate catastrophe.

"It is imperative that real action is taken to reduce emissions and global mean temperature rise well below 2ºC as possible. Without this climate change will spiral out of control; the world will suffer even more extreme weather, water crises, and increased hunger. Millions of people will become climate refugees. Governments must take a leadership role and make strong commitments to tackle climate change, including a revolution in the way the world produces and uses energy, and strong action to end deforestation" continued Edwards.

To keep global average temperature rise AS FAR below 2ºC as possible and for governments to honour their 15 year old commitments to avoid dangerous climate change, Greenpeace is calling for cuts of:

At least -50% globally by 2050, with a 1990 base year

At least -30% by developed countries by 2020, with a 1990 base year

At least -80% for developed countries by 2050, with a 1990 base year

ENDS

Other contacts: Gavin Edwards, Greenpeace International, Head of Climate +31 6 52 39 14 29

Exp. contact date: 2007-12-20 00:00:00

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