Blogger profile

Kumi Naidoo

Passionately involved in liberation struggles from a young age, he continues to speak truth to power across the range of Greenpeace campaign activities around the globe. He is dedicated to engagement, dialogue and change and seeks a green and peaceful planet for all the world’s inhabitants.

More blogger information

  • Article originally published in the Guardian.

    An oasis is a body of water, ringed by greenery and beyond that, a lifeless, endless landscape that coughs up dust and sand whenever the wind touches it. It is a globally understood symbol of something precious, fragile and rare.

    The entire population of the planet: plants, animals and people, are crowded around that symbolic single, lonely body of water. All of us jostling and pushing to get our share. Some are close to the source through sheer luck, others have muscled their way in. This has left those without fiscal or political clout on the fringes, unable to get near fresh water for sanitation, agriculture or even to drink.

    The coal industry is one of the groups which has managed to muscle its way in.

    This year, as policymakers work t... Read more >

  • Don't bet on coal and oil growth

    Blogpost by Kumi Naidoo - January 28, 2014 at 9:51

    A mind-boggling sum of about $800 for each person on the planet is invested into fossil fuel companies through the global capital markets alone. That’s roughly 10% of the total capital invested in listed companies. The amount of money invested into the 200 biggest fossil fuel companies through financial markets is estimated at 5.5 trillion dollars. This should be an impressive amount of money for anyone reading this. 

    By keeping their money in coal and oil companies, investors are betting a vast amount of wealth, including the pensions and savings of millions of people, on high future demand for dirty fuels. The investment has enabled fossil fuel companies to massively raise their spending on expanding extractable reserves, with oil and gas companies alone (state-owned ones included) spend... Read more >

  • One of the most challenging weeks of my working life starts today: the week of the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos.

    Over 2,500 Presidents, Prime Minsters, CEOs, Celebrities and Academics with a smattering of civil society, will be holed up in a small and posh mountain resort in Switzerland to discuss, in the words of the WEF, “improving the state of the world by engaging business, political, academic and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas.”

    At a moment when 20th century power structures typified by the Davos devotees, try to squeeze the last buck out of a denuded environment and a failing industrial complex, new power structures are emerging, together with new threats, new solutions and new opportunities.

    Many pay up to 250...

    Read more >
  • Q&A published in Yale Environment 360. 

    In a Yale Environment 360 interview, the outspoken executive director of Greenpeace discusses why his organization’s activists braved imprisonment in Russia to stop Arctic oil drilling and what needs to be done to make a sharp turn away from fossil fuels and toward a green energy economy.

    by Diane Toomey

    Kumi Naidoo, the international executive director of Greenpeace, is intimately familiar with the Prirazlomnaya drilling platform in the Russian Arctic. In August 2012, he and five other Greenpeace activists were hosed down with frigid water and pelted with pieces of metal as they attempted to climb aboard the platform, which recently became the first offshore installation to begin producing oil in the Arctic Ocean. 

    Greenpeace and Prirazlomnaya were b... Read more >

  • Action on climate change would wipe billions off oil company balance sheets and they are determined to silence their critics.