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Nick Young

Nick has worked with Greenpeace for more than 10 years and is now Head of Digital at Greenpeace NZ.

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  • Detox campaign hat trick: Adidas joins Nike and Puma

    Blogpost by Nick Young - September 1, 2011 at 14:04

    David Beckham lookalike in an Adidas t-shirt showing off his Detox tattoo

    Adidas has just announced it's goign toxic free! This is great news for our environment, our rivers and the millions of people in China and elsewhere who depend on rivers for drinking water and agriculture. Without the coming together of Greenpeace supporters and activists to challenge Nike, Adidas and other would-be champions to lead the way towards a toxic-free future, it would have taken much longer to achieve.

    The world's top three sportswear brands -- Nike, Adidas and Puma -- have now committed publicly to eliminate all discharges of hazardous chemicals throughout their supply chain and across the entire lifecycle of their products by 2020. (See Adidas's statement here)

    No 'safe' amount of hazardous chemicals

    Importantly, Adidas's commitment to ‘zero discharge’ of hazardou... Read more >

  • We won’t back down to Sealord’s bully tactics

    Blogpost by Nick Young - September 1, 2011 at 10:53

    Our subvertising campaign on Monday targeting Sealord and its unsustainable tuna was hard to miss and it certainly didn’t escape the attention of the Sealord management or their lawyers.

    Yesterday afternoon we received a very grumpy letter from Sealord’s lawyers Russell McVeagh questioning our facts and telling us to stop our campaign - or else.

    But - we stand behind all of the statements we have made regarding Sealord’s tuna sourcing and we won’t be put off that easily.

    We believe that New Zealanders have the right to know the ecological impact of the food they purchase, in order to make informed choices at the checkout. The feedback on Sealord’s own Facebook page and the many thousands of emails sent to Sealord show how keen kiwis are for Sealord to mend its ways.

    Our message is ver... Read more >

  • Nice new logo Sealord but what about the tuna?

    Blogpost by Nick Young - August 29, 2011 at 7:18

    Sealord has a shiny new logo - but inside the can - it's the same old tuna.



    Sealord tuna is caught unsustainably using massive purse seines and fish aggregation devices. It's a method that indiscriminately kills all manner of other sealife.

    So our message to Sealord today is Nice logo - Bad tuna.

    As Auckland wakes up this morning to see the Sealord logo in a whole new light.

    A citywide subvertisement campaign involving dozens of people began at 3am this morning. It includes what is possibly the world's largest tuna can, banners in central Auckland and on all main arterial routes into Auckland, a  sky banner, mobile billboards and a blitz of posters and flyers throughout the city.

    Here's the live feed from the day:



    It's a message that can't be missed. Check out the live feed here - and y... Read more >

  • UPDATE: After receiving almost 2000 emails from concerned kiwis The Warehouse has announced it will suspend all orders of Cottonsoft products. People power works!

     

    The wholesale destruction of Indonesian rainforests is wiping out the habitat of critically endangered Sumatran tigers – and the NZ based company Cottonsofthas now been linked to this destruction.

    Cottonsoft is owned by Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) - one of the most notorious players in the destruction of Indonesian rainforests.

    After an eight month investigation, we have today released evidence that Cottonsoft toilet paper contains fibre from trashed Indonesian rainforests.

    Cottonsoft refused to disclose where it was sourcing its toilet paper from so we sent samples to a US laboratory for forensic testing. Their tests conf... Read more >

  • Shell: "Something has gone wrong here"

    Blogpost by Nick Young - August 19, 2011 at 9:06

    Shell has apologised for the North Sea oil spill and for its own lack of transparency saying: "The fact is something has gone wrong here, so whatever risk assessment we made about the condition of these pipes has proven to be wrong."

    It's not the most reassuring apology in the world; alongside the apology came the admission that the second leak could take weeks to fix, that the pipe that sprung the leak is more than 30 years old, and that if Shell's risk assessment, maintenance and inspection processes had been better, the accident wouldn't have happened in the first place.

    The spill, in other words, seems to have been the result of systemic failures on Shell's part.

    The company's abysmal track record on safety does little to dispel this suggestion. In 2009 and 2010, the Gannet Alpha p... Read more >

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