Blogger profile

Nick Young

Nick has worked with Greenpeace for more than 10 years and is now Head of Digital at Greenpeace NZ.

More blogger information

  • Nice new logo Sealord but what about the tuna?

    Blogpost by Nick Young - August 29, 2011 at 7:18

    Sealord has a shiny new logo - but inside the can - it's the same old tuna.



    Sealord tuna is caught unsustainably using massive purse seines and fish aggregation devices. It's a method that indiscriminately kills all manner of other sealife.

    So our message to Sealord today is Nice logo - Bad tuna.

    As Auckland wakes up this morning to see the Sealord logo in a whole new light.

    A citywide subvertisement campaign involving dozens of people began at 3am this morning. It includes what is possibly the world's largest tuna can, banners in central Auckland and on all main arterial routes into Auckland, a  sky banner, mobile billboards and a blitz of posters and flyers throughout the city.

    Here's the live feed from the day:



    It's a message that can't be missed. Check out the live feed here - and y... Read more >

  • UPDATE: After receiving almost 2000 emails from concerned kiwis The Warehouse has announced it will suspend all orders of Cottonsoft products. People power works!

     

    The wholesale destruction of Indonesian rainforests is wiping out the habitat of critically endangered Sumatran tigers – and the NZ based company Cottonsofthas now been linked to this destruction.

    Cottonsoft is owned by Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) - one of the most notorious players in the destruction of Indonesian rainforests.

    After an eight month investigation, we have today released evidence that Cottonsoft toilet paper contains fibre from trashed Indonesian rainforests.

    Cottonsoft refused to disclose where it was sourcing its toilet paper from so we sent samples to a US laboratory for forensic testing. Their tests conf... Read more >

  • Shell: "Something has gone wrong here"

    Blogpost by Nick Young - August 19, 2011 at 9:06

    Shell has apologised for the North Sea oil spill and for its own lack of transparency saying: "The fact is something has gone wrong here, so whatever risk assessment we made about the condition of these pipes has proven to be wrong."

    It's not the most reassuring apology in the world; alongside the apology came the admission that the second leak could take weeks to fix, that the pipe that sprung the leak is more than 30 years old, and that if Shell's risk assessment, maintenance and inspection processes had been better, the accident wouldn't have happened in the first place.

    The spill, in other words, seems to have been the result of systemic failures on Shell's part.

    The company's abysmal track record on safety does little to dispel this suggestion. In 2009 and 2010, the Gannet Alpha p... Read more >

  • Advert placed by APP subsidiary Solaris in Australian newspapers

    One of Asia Pulp and Paper's Australian companies has been caught in an embarrassing PR incident, in which clumsy personal attacks on Greenpeace campaigners and others have been traced back to its staff.

    While our global focus has been on toy companies like Mattel and Hasbro, our Australian colleagues have also concentrated on a more localised APP connection. One of the major supermarkets - IGA - was one of APP's biggest customers down under, and used APP products to make some of its own-brand toilet paper.

    The team have spent some time trying to convince IGA to ditch APP and its Australian affiliate Solaris. Then came the video of a tiger dying within a plantation operated by one of APP's suppliers and just miles from where forest is being cleared to feed APP’s mills. The video and the... Read more >

  • Create a revolution in your wardrobe - part two

    Blogpost by Nick Young - August 11, 2011 at 8:15

    Girls sort scrap fabric in a family workshop in Gurao, China where the economy i

    In the second half of our tips on greening your wardrobe - to help you clean up your clothing inspired by our Detox campaign - we look at saying no to child labour, questioning distressed denim, avoiding greenwash, spring cleaning, speaking out and spreading the word.

    Read part one >>

    8) Say no to child labour and sweatshops and yes to fair prices

    Fairtrade products are booming. In addition to coffee, tea, bananas and chocolate, there are now Fairtrade clothes. Fairtrade helps mainly the people who produce the goods. In poorer countries fair trade'guarantees decent working conditions, such as no use of child labour, and payment of a living wage.

    For example, rather than sell their harvest at dumping prices on the world market, cotton farmers get 36 cents per kilo of cotton and 41 c... Read more >

51 - 55 of 111 results.