Zero deforestation

Forest destruction produces about one fifth of global greenhouse gas emissions - more than all the cars, planes, and trains in the world.

Lulu John, Warume Sakas and Aebi Sakas bring home food and medicine gathered from the forest at Elie, Middle Fly District, PNG.

The world's ancient forests are still being destroyed, even though we know that they provide the world with clean, fresh water, support as much as 90 per cent of the earth's land-based plant and animals and play a critical role in shaping the world's climate. They are also home to millions of forest dependent people. Yet every two seconds a forest area the size of a soccer pitch is logged or burned. Less than 20 per cent of the earth's original forest cover remains in intact forest landscapes. More than one third of this is under threat.

Industrial logging is the greatest menace to the forests survival. Transnational corporations have destructive operations and often work outside the law, harvesting the worlds' last remaining ancient forests.

Incredibly, these irreplaceable habitats are cut down to make cheap paper and wood products, such as phone books, milk cartons and chopsticks. Huge volumes of plywood, much of it used to make disposable concrete moulds, come from ancient forests.

Logging also contributes to climate change because carbon, a greenhouse gas, is released when trees are cut down. Present rates of forest destruction account for 15 per cent of global carbon emissions.

The forests can be saved

This destruction is unnecessary. Environmentally and socially responsible forest management can, and is, being practised worldwide. However, with currently less than 5% credibly certified as responsibly managed, ancient forests continue to be at risk from accelerating rates of destructive and illegal logging.

If we use wood and paper efficiently, we would not need to take the wood from our ancient forests, consumer demand could be met by well-managed secondary forests, plantation, recycling and non-wood sources like hemp.

What is Greenpeace doing internationally?

Greenpeace is campaigning globally to protect the last remaining ancient forests by opposing their destruction and supporting community-based solutions, through:

  • A moratorium on industrial developments in large intact ancient forests so that land use planning can be completed and a network of protected areas established.
  • Ensuring governments increase their efforts to stop illegal logging and the trade in illegal wood products. Also that they stop funding or approving projects that expand logging into ancient forests or that convert or degrade ancient forests.
  • Supporting community forest use 'solutions' that protect the forest ecosystem.

What is Greenpeace New Zealand doing?

Greenpeace New Zealand's work to save our ancient forests focuses mainly on the protection of the Paradise Forests, which are located through Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Indonesia.

What can you do?

  • There are several easy things you can do to help - go to the what you can do pages and take action to save our ancient forests!

The latest updates

 

Deni celebrate their forest homeland in the Brazilian Amazon

Blog entry by Paulo Adario, Greenpeace Brazil | September 20, 2011

Greenpeace volunteers helped the Deni, a people indigenous to the Brazilian Amazon, demarcate their homeland: 1,6 million acres of fantastic forest. Image: Greenpeace September 11, 2001 was not only a day of major tragedy in the...

Lego shows leadership in tackling deforestation

Blog entry by Andy Tait, Senior Campaign Advisor Greenpeace UK | July 8, 2011

But are other toy companies throwing rainforest destruction out of the pram? When Ken dumped Barbie last month Mattel was not the only toy company put under the spotlight for their role in rainforest destruction. Our investigation...

Ken’s desperate phone call to Mattel about Barbie

Blog entry by Laura K | July 6, 2011

Ken’s picked up the phone. And now we’d like you to drop Mattel a call too. It’s been nearly a month now since Barbie’s secret deforestation habit was revealed to Ken in a shocking interview that has now been seen by over 1.3...

Barbie & Mattel’s deforestation habit goes ‘viral’

Blog entry by Laura K. | June 16, 2011

Breaking up in public isn’t easy. But Ken and Barbie, who split last week over Barbie’s rainforest wrecking, have done so in a very, very public way.  Ken’s video interview  that broke the scandal has now been seen over one million...

Companies like Mattel are still pushing Sumatran tigers to the brink

Blog entry by Phil Radford | June 14, 2011

Mattel's paper purchasing polices are weaker than Ken’s plastic handshake. Poor Barbie. She’s survived fifty years of bad outfits, sudden beheadings at the hands of younger brothers and the wrath of feminists everywhere. Underneath...

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