Zero deforestation

Forest destruction produces about one fifth of global greenhouse gas emissions - more than all the cars, planes, and trains in the world.

Lulu John, Warume Sakas and Aebi Sakas bring home food and medicine gathered from the forest at Elie, Middle Fly District, PNG.

The world's ancient forests are still being destroyed, even though we know that they provide the world with clean, fresh water, support as much as 90 per cent of the earth's land-based plant and animals and play a critical role in shaping the world's climate. They are also home to millions of forest dependent people. Yet every two seconds a forest area the size of a soccer pitch is logged or burned. Less than 20 per cent of the earth's original forest cover remains in intact forest landscapes. More than one third of this is under threat.

Industrial logging is the greatest menace to the forests survival. Transnational corporations have destructive operations and often work outside the law, harvesting the worlds' last remaining ancient forests.

Incredibly, these irreplaceable habitats are cut down to make cheap paper and wood products, such as phone books, milk cartons and chopsticks. Huge volumes of plywood, much of it used to make disposable concrete moulds, come from ancient forests.

Logging also contributes to climate change because carbon, a greenhouse gas, is released when trees are cut down. Present rates of forest destruction account for 15 per cent of global carbon emissions.

The forests can be saved

This destruction is unnecessary. Environmentally and socially responsible forest management can, and is, being practised worldwide. However, with currently less than 5% credibly certified as responsibly managed, ancient forests continue to be at risk from accelerating rates of destructive and illegal logging.

If we use wood and paper efficiently, we would not need to take the wood from our ancient forests, consumer demand could be met by well-managed secondary forests, plantation, recycling and non-wood sources like hemp.

What is Greenpeace doing internationally?

Greenpeace is campaigning globally to protect the last remaining ancient forests by opposing their destruction and supporting community-based solutions, through:

  • A moratorium on industrial developments in large intact ancient forests so that land use planning can be completed and a network of protected areas established.
  • Ensuring governments increase their efforts to stop illegal logging and the trade in illegal wood products. Also that they stop funding or approving projects that expand logging into ancient forests or that convert or degrade ancient forests.
  • Supporting community forest use 'solutions' that protect the forest ecosystem.

What is Greenpeace New Zealand doing?

Greenpeace New Zealand's work to save our ancient forests focuses mainly on the protection of the Paradise Forests, which are located through Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Indonesia.

What can you do?

  • There are several easy things you can do to help - go to the what you can do pages and take action to save our ancient forests!

The latest updates

 

Kit kat update: Quick response from Nestle but not much to report

Blog entry by nick | March 18, 2010

You have to hand it to Nestle - they're quick off the mark when it comes to launching a PR offensive, and with orang-utans hanging around (and sometimes off) their premises around the UK and Europe, they've released a statement ...

Nestlé give rainforests 'a break'

Feature story | March 17, 2010 at 11:16

Protests are taking place across Europe today beginning with around 100 Greenpeace activists, some dressed as orang-utans, heading to Nestlé’s headquarters and factories in the UK, Germany and the Netherlands. They called on Nestlé staff to urge...

Fonterra's Climate Crimes: A call to action

Feature story | November 17, 2009 at 0:00

Just before dawn this morning Greenpeace activists shut down a mine pit at the Southland ‘New Vale’ lignite coalmine. This was the third of a series of actions targeting Fonterra’s climate crimes. Support is now building for a public protest at...

Inglourious treehuggers dam climate change!

Feature story | November 3, 2009 at 18:56

If we told you that there was one single way to cut a fifth of global greenhouse emissions - that simply involved hugging trees - would you believe us? Probably not - but that's exactly what's required. And we've got 50 activists in the...

Welcome to Kampar – Greenpeace intervenes to stop forest destruction as Copenhagen...

Blog entry by Nick Young | October 30, 2009

View Map The peninsula is bounded by the sea to the North and East, the Kampar river to the south, and has smaller rivers and canals crisscrossing it. The landscape is surrounded by water – and beneath the forest is one of the...

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