Zero deforestation

Forest destruction produces about one fifth of global greenhouse gas emissions - more than all the cars, planes, and trains in the world.

Lulu John, Warume Sakas and Aebi Sakas bring home food and medicine gathered from the forest at Elie, Middle Fly District, PNG.

The world's ancient forests are still being destroyed, even though we know that they provide the world with clean, fresh water, support as much as 90 per cent of the earth's land-based plant and animals and play a critical role in shaping the world's climate. They are also home to millions of forest dependent people. Yet every two seconds a forest area the size of a soccer pitch is logged or burned. Less than 20 per cent of the earth's original forest cover remains in intact forest landscapes. More than one third of this is under threat.

Industrial logging is the greatest menace to the forests survival. Transnational corporations have destructive operations and often work outside the law, harvesting the worlds' last remaining ancient forests.

Incredibly, these irreplaceable habitats are cut down to make cheap paper and wood products, such as phone books, milk cartons and chopsticks. Huge volumes of plywood, much of it used to make disposable concrete moulds, come from ancient forests.

Logging also contributes to climate change because carbon, a greenhouse gas, is released when trees are cut down. Present rates of forest destruction account for 15 per cent of global carbon emissions.

The forests can be saved

This destruction is unnecessary. Environmentally and socially responsible forest management can, and is, being practised worldwide. However, with currently less than 5% credibly certified as responsibly managed, ancient forests continue to be at risk from accelerating rates of destructive and illegal logging.

If we use wood and paper efficiently, we would not need to take the wood from our ancient forests, consumer demand could be met by well-managed secondary forests, plantation, recycling and non-wood sources like hemp.

What is Greenpeace doing internationally?

Greenpeace is campaigning globally to protect the last remaining ancient forests by opposing their destruction and supporting community-based solutions, through:

  • A moratorium on industrial developments in large intact ancient forests so that land use planning can be completed and a network of protected areas established.
  • Ensuring governments increase their efforts to stop illegal logging and the trade in illegal wood products. Also that they stop funding or approving projects that expand logging into ancient forests or that convert or degrade ancient forests.
  • Supporting community forest use 'solutions' that protect the forest ecosystem.

What is Greenpeace New Zealand doing?

Greenpeace New Zealand's work to save our ancient forests focuses mainly on the protection of the Paradise Forests, which are located through Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Indonesia.

What can you do?

  • There are several easy things you can do to help - go to the what you can do pages and take action to save our ancient forests!

The latest updates

 

Mars and P&G: one just took deforestation seriously, and the other didn’t

Blog entry by Areeba Hamid | March 11, 2014

Here’s how two different corporations respond to a consumers’ very real and very serious concerns… One makes a clear promise with ambitious time lines; the other continues as if it’s business as usual. This is the difference between...

Why Procter & Gamble does not share our concerns

Blog entry by Joao Talocchi | March 10, 2014

Last week Greenpeace activists unfurled two 60-foot banners at Procter & Gamble’s global headquarters in Cincinnati, exposing the fact that P&G is putting the Sumatran Tiger’s survival on the line. One of our activists dressed as a...

Photos from the orangutan cemetery

Blog entry by Michael Hedelain | March 5, 2014

Bones from an orangutan near Tanjung Puting National Park ©   ULET IFANSASTI Proctor & Gamble claims that an astonishing 4.8 billion people worldwide use their products, which include anti-dandruff shampoo Head & Shoulders. What...

Tackling illegal logging should not be a yearly event

Blog entry by Danielle van Oijen | March 4, 2014

Anniversaries can vary in significance, both to people individually and to wider audiences. On paper, the first anniversary of the introduction of a piece of timber legislation might not be a birthday that is chalked up in many...

Pulling back the shower curtain: Find out about P&G's dirty secret!

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | February 26, 2014

Procter & Gamble claims that nearly 5 billion people use it products, among them the anti-dandruff shampoo Head & Shoulders. But what's not so squeaky clean is that P&G is making those billions of consumers unknowingly part of an...

11 - 15 of 77 results.

Categories