Project Aurora - a Journey to Save the Arctic

This April, a group of young people is going to the North Pole to declare it protected on behalf of all life on Earth. Backed by millions they will plant a flag for the future on the seabed and call for a sanctuary in the uninhabited area around the pole.

Meet Team Aurora. They belong to a movement which is almost three million strong. Together, we are calling for world leaders to protect the Arctic and fight climate change. We believe melting sea ice is a warning, not simply a chance to drill for more oil.

During this unique ceremony at the top of the world we will offer respect to those who came before us and hope for those yet to be born.

The Arctic is melting fast. This is affecting the lives of millions of people and animals who live there. But it also reaches you, because sea ice helps to cool the planet and keep our climate stable.

Sign the Arctic scroll to get involved and be the first to receive updates from the team.

The latest updates


Interactive Map of the Arctic

Blog entry by Jessica Wilson | April 16, 2013

Into the Arctic  is a digital, interactive map we just launched today with the North Pole at its centre. The map features a number of static and dynamic layers that visualise the beauty of the Arctic, the threats it faces and our...

On top of the world, a ceremony for millions

Blog entry by Jess Wilson | April 16, 2013

Something incredible happened yesterday. Our  four young explorers  on a mission with Greenpeace have planted a flag on the seabed beneath the North Pole, at the same spot where a submarine planted a Russian flag claiming the Arctic...

The Icy Arctic Treadmill

Blog entry by Eric Phillips, Polar Guide for Team Aurora | April 15, 2013

This week, the phenomenal team here has been learning first hand what I’ve been discovering more and more since first coming here 12 years ago: that the frozen North is an unpredictable, uncontrollable, unforgiving place. The North...

When is inevitable not inevitable?

Blog entry by Charlie Kronick | April 13, 2013

The end of 2012 and first months of 2013 have seen a remarkable change in the fight to protect the Arctic from risky and dangerous oil exploration.    Three oil “majors” –   Total , Statoil  and  Conoco-Phillips  - have withdrawn from...

At the North Pole, A New World - #2thePole

Blog entry by James Turner | April 12, 2013

I'm writing this inside a small yellow tent on the frozen Arctic Ocean, while shoveling snow into a kettle. I'm on my way to the North Pole with a  group of young people  to declare it protected and call for a sanctuary there. Today...

Three strikes and you're out

Blog entry by Sune Scheller | April 11, 2013

This morning, two polar bears scaled the  Statoil oil rig  West Hercules  bound for the world’s northernmost drilling sites in the Arctic. Just a few hours later the Norwegian state-owned oil company announced that these frontier...

The Making of an Arctic Time Capsule

Blog entry by Jessica Miller | April 8, 2013

The Frame:  The capsule’s frame is made of titanium, a very long-lasting, inert material. All the bolts and nuts are made from titanium as well. Inscribed on the inert titanium ring that encircles the capsule are the words: Project...

In Pod We Trust

Blog entry by Jess Wilson | April 8, 2013

Every couple of months, something bizarre happens at work that convinces me I must have one of the strangest jobs on the planet. And these moments often come in the form of a question. Questions like, “Did One Direction’s tweet...

The Stars Align Over the North Pole

Blog entry by Josefina Skerk | April 8, 2013

Today is the day we have been all been waiting for, and we have some exciting news to share with you. When we planned this expedition, our ambition was big already — to ski to the North Pole to lower a special pod and a flag for the...

Warming up for the North Pole, keeping a promise we made

Blog entry by Iris Andrews | April 4, 2013

Last June, as we launched our campaign to  save the Arctic , we made a promise. We promised that if a million joined our movement, we would take their names to the North Pole and plant them on the seabed 4km beneath the ice as...

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