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Daily blogs from the frontlines of the Greenpeace planet down under. 

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  • A couple questions for Shell

    Blogpost by Ben Ayliffe - August 18, 2011 at 11:14

    go beyond oil

    What does the ongoing North Sea oil spill say about Shell’s plans to open up the Arctic, where an accident would be all but impossible to clean up?

    Personally, it seems to me that if Shell can’t get it right in the supposedly ultra-safe North Sea then there’s no reason to think they’d be able to manage it in the freezing Beaufort Sea. As Shell continues with plans to drill in the Arctic waters off Alaska next year, these are precisely the sort of question it must answer.

    By a quirk of fate this week people have the opportunity to do just that - by taking part in the company’s “Developing Arctic resources safely and responsibly” web chat on 18th August.

    I’m sure it will be make enlightening listening and we want as many people to get involved as possible. You can register to take... Read more >

  • The spectre of Shell

    Blogpost by Cindy Baxter - August 17, 2011 at 15:03

    'The flames of Shell are flames of Hell,
    We bask below their light,
    Nought for us to serve the blight,
    Of cursed neglect and cursed Shell.”

    - Ogoni protest song, circa 1970.

    As global oil reserves run low, the oil giants are looking further and further afield in search of new oil. From the Arctic to the extreme deep waters of New Zealand, the oil drillers are preparing to take greater and greater risks in the search for the last drops of oil - but they've got  a fight on their hands.

    Here in New Zealand we’ve suddenly got Anadarko, Petrobras and now Shell virtually falling over each other to get at the promised oil reserves previously thought to be too difficult – and too risky to access.

    But we’ve seen their interest cooled by a groundswell of public resistance. From protests by... Read more >

  • Farewell to the Rainbow Warrior II

    Blogpost by nyoung - August 16, 2011 at 20:45

    After 52 years at sea (22 years as a Greenpeace ship), the current Rainbow Warrior is heading for a new life. Over the last few days, the bell was removed, the ship’s mascot dolphin taken down and the Rainbow Warrior’s named painted over. Finally, today at a ceremony in Singapore, the Rainbow Warrior was transferred to Friendship, a Bangladesh based NGO which will refit it for use as a hospital ship.

    The ship will be renamed Rongdhonu, Bengali for Rainbow. She will serve the coastal belt of Bangladesh and the Bay of Bengal delivering primary and secondary medical assistance to some of the most vulnerable communities of the world, communities that have little or no access to basic health care facilities. The Rongdhonu will also serve as an emergency medical ship around the regio... Read more >

  • Published: Cairn's oil spill response plan!

    Blogpost by Bex - Greenpeace UK - August 16, 2011 at 7:55

    In the event of an oil spill, turn immediately to page 13

    You know that oil spill response plan that Cairn has been refusing to publish? The one that tens of thousands of you asked to see? The one we went to the Arctic and to Cairn's Edinburgh HQ to look for? The one they were so worried we'd found, they slapped a legal interdict on us to prevent us from publishing it?

    Well, it's been published. Not by Cairn - who have never wanted to release the plan - but by the government of Greenland which says it has "decided to publish the oil spill contingency plan in Greenland after having heard the wish of the public for such publication". That's your emails, that is. Thank you.

    The response plan is here (it's tricky to download so we've put it here too ) - feel free to scrutinise it and let us know what you think in the comments. Our team in the UK... Read more >

  • The Detox campaign is in full-flow - but we still need your help!

    Blogpost by Josh - August 12, 2011 at 11:02

    We’re confident Adidas or Nike will commit to leading a Detox revolution in the clothing industry, but it takes time. In the meantime, why not start your own fashion revolution in your wardrobe? Check out our guide to help you make fashion choices that are good for you and the environment.

    The Detox campaign kicked off when our mysterious XM3N mannequins finally revealed their mission to clean up China’s rivers. Their message was spread by our video – watched and shared by 100s of 1000s of Greenpeace supporters and sports lovers all over the world.

    Then people really started to get involved and the game was well and truly on.

    Actions from Argentina to the Netherlands and Spain – including a world wide striptease – made sure the world’s biggest brands couldn’t ignore the challenge

    Fu... Read more >

  • Create a revolution in your wardrobe - part two

    Blogpost by Nick Young - August 11, 2011 at 8:15

    Girls sort scrap fabric in a family workshop in Gurao, China where the economy i

    In the second half of our tips on greening your wardrobe - to help you clean up your clothing inspired by our Detox campaign - we look at saying no to child labour, questioning distressed denim, avoiding greenwash, spring cleaning, speaking out and spreading the word.

    Read part one >>

    8) Say no to child labour and sweatshops and yes to fair prices

    Fairtrade products are booming. In addition to coffee, tea, bananas and chocolate, there are now Fairtrade clothes. Fairtrade helps mainly the people who produce the goods. In poorer countries fair trade'guarantees decent working conditions, such as no use of child labour, and payment of a living wage.

    For example, rather than sell their harvest at dumping prices on the world market, cotton farmers get 36 cents per kilo of cotton and 41 c... Read more >

  • Would the real tuna please stand up

    Blogpost by Phil Crawford - August 10, 2011 at 15:11

    When is a tuna not a tuna? Unfortunately too often in the Pacific where widely-used industrial tuna fishing methods catch far more species than just tuna.

    Out on the water everything becomes tuna. That is until it’s been hauled on board tuna boats using large purse seine nets set around fish aggregation devices (FADs). However, by that time it’s usually too late and anything which is not tuna, collectively known as bycatch, is thrown back into the sea, often injured, dead or dying.

    According to statistics circulated by Sealord, bycatch of other species is five to 10 times higher when purse seiners use FADs. This wasteful method also has serious impact on tuna stocks, as juvenile and undersized tunas make up 15-20 per cent of the catch.

    New Zealand brands of canned tuna don’t catch their... Read more >

  • Contaminated seafood and government cover-up at Fukushima

    Blogpost by Justin Keating - August 10, 2011 at 7:53

    Our team of radiation experts has found high levels of radiation in seafood caught by Japanese fishermen off the coast of Japan. This, along with the news that the Japanese government covered up the true extent of radiation releases from Fukushima and so put people in danger, shows it is long past time that urgent, transparent action was taken by officials.

    At a press conference in Japan earlier today (video here and here), we explained how our radiation experts had visited ports in Iwaki prefecture between 22nd and 24th of July and conducted sampling of seafood with the help from local fishermen. The French laboratories ACRO and CRIIRAD analysed the radioactive contamination and detected high levels of radioactivity in a number of samples. This means that the contamination of the... Read more >

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