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Daily blogs from the frontlines of the Greenpeace planet down under. 

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  • Photos that inspired millions to take action

    Blogpost by Sudhanshu Malhotra - August 19, 2016 at 7:42

    On World Photography Day, Greenpeace celebrates the power of photography to inspire action and speak truth to power.

    It’s a tough call to select 10 images from the more than 18,000 that Greenpeace has produced in the last 12 months. But this selection gave me a chance to look back at the amazing work that’s happening across the world.

    These are not the most beautiful images, but they represent the diversity of the movement. They are a testimony to the courage and willingness of people power to fight for a better future. They define the role of photography in activism. They have the power to transfer the energy and emotions to its audiences; to tell a story that is untold or an event that cannot be put in words.

    We have images from Indigenous communities in the Amazon to coral reefs in Au... Read more >

  • MYTH 1: Solar is only for the rich

    The most common argument we hear against solar energy is that encouraging it will somehow widen the gap between rich and poor. The logic goes that because “only rich people can afford solar”, the so-called poor people without it will then have to pay a larger share of the costs to maintain the national grid.

    More on this sharing grid costs thing when you hit Myth #3, but in a nutshell, we say, bah humbug to that! Statistically, we’re seeing that solar being a rich kid’s game is simply not true. Of the customers using solar provider solarcity’s “solarZero” energy service, around 40% are below median income households. Under this service, households can get rigged up without the cost of buying the solar system.

    And if you think about it logically, this makes s... Read more >

  • Destructive palm oil company IOI let off the hook too easily by RSPO

    Blogpost by Annisa Rahmawati - August 11, 2016 at 14:05

    A major palm oil company, which had its sustainability certificates suspended for violating rules designed to prevent the destruction of Indonesia's forests and peatlands, has had those certificates reinstated. This shocking decision by the industry's own sustainability group to lift the suspension sends a message that it's OK for palm oil companies to continue trashing forests in pursuit of profits.

    Tree stump in the PT Bumi Sawit Sejahtera (IOI) oil palm concession in Ketapang, West Kalimantan.Tree stump in the PT Bumi Sawit Sejahtera (IOI) oil palm concession in Ketapang, West Kalimantan.

    IOI, one of the biggest palm oil suppliers in the world, was suspended by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) in April 2016 for clearing peatland areas and developing land without obtaining required permits. As a result, many of its big-name customers walked away such as Unilever, Cargi... Read more >

  • Farming, the rainforests and you

    Blogpost by Kathy Cumming - August 10, 2016 at 17:07

    12 Aug 2016 - Fonterra has this morning committed to using only responsible palm oil products throughout its supply chains. This means it'll use only PKE and other palm oil products from suppliers that aren't clearing rainforest, developing peatlands or exploiting local communities and workers. A big first step for Fonterra....although we'll now be looking to them for a full PKE phase out.

    Environmental campaigning often requires patience. As Gandhi used to say "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win”.

    This week our hard work (and patience) paid off. But it’s not so much us who won, as our farms and rainforests and climate.

    Landcorp has announced it will no longer use palm kernel expeller (PKE) on its farms and will focus on grass-feeding its a...

    Read more >
  • Friendship forged in the crucible of action

    Blogpost by Mike Smith - August 9, 2016 at 7:53

    This blog was written to mark International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples.

    Greenpeace campaigner Steve Abel greets Elvis Teddy with a traditional hongi, a traditional Maori greeting, as the Greenpeace crew of the new Rainbow Warrior meet Te Whanau a Apanui (Maori tribe) at Whangaparaoa, East Cape to celebrate the withdrawal oil giant Petrobras which had planned to drill for deep sea oil. Elvis Teddy, who skippered the San Pietro fishing boat, was arrested by police during the protest.

    Greenpeace campaigner Steve Abel greets Elvis Teddy with a hongi, a traditional Maori greeting, as the Greenpeace crew of the new Rainbow Warrior meet Te Whanau a Apanui at Whangaparaoa, East Cape to celebrate the withdrawal oil giant Petrobras which had planned to drill for deep sea oil. Elvis Teddy, who skippered the San Pietro fishing boat, was arrested by police during the protest.

    Kia ora my name is Mike. I am a Maori member of the northern tribes of the far north territories of Aotearoa - New Zealand. I’ve been an indigenous rights activist for most of my adult life. During the 1980’s through to the 90’s together with many others, I was engaged in the struggle to correct historical and contemporary ... Read more >

  • Survivors of nuclear warfare in Japan are calling for an end to nuclear weapons

    Blogpost by Tamara Stark - August 6, 2016 at 12:01

    This week marks 71 years since atomic bombs were dropped on Japan and devastated the populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Often we do not mark a 71st anniversary - unlike a 25th or 50th anniversary, a 71st is simply one more year among many. To many however, 2016 doesn’t feel like just any year. It’s been a year of conflicts, of political turmoil and instability in many countries, of violent and indiscriminate attacks on civilian populations.

    Peace doves fly on the eve of the 60th Anniversary of the Hiroshima Atomic Bombing in 2005. The message of peace reads: "No More Hiroshima" Peace doves fly on the eve of the 60th Anniversary of the Hiroshima Atomic Bombing in 2005. The message of peace reads: "No More Hiroshima"  Read more >

    The media depicts a world that is unpredictable and at times frightening, and it feels appropriate to take time to listen to the voices of people who - more than most - have lived through the aftermath of ...

  • VICTORY! Mega-dam in the heart of Amazon cancelled!

    Blogpost by Danicley Aguiar - August 5, 2016 at 9:43

    On Wednesday, I had barely had breakfast when I was surprised by some absolutely amazing news: The Brazilian environmental agency – IBAMA – announced it would cancel the process for licensing the São Luiz do Tapajós (SLT) mega-dam in the heart of the Amazon.

    Once my heart rate returned to normal, I started to call my colleagues and Munduruku leaders, seeking confirmation.

    Today, it’s official: IBAMA has cancelled the SLT mega-dam. It’s time to celebrate this incredible news! I'd like to thank all of you who stood with the Munduruku Indigenous People and helped make this victory possible.

    Over these last months we truly believed that sooner or later IBAMA would need to recognise the meg-adam project's significant environmental and social impacts in the region. Now, with IBAMA's decision...

    Read more >
  • Plastic pollution: Five easy tips to reduce how much plastic you use

    Blogpost by Lena Hoeck - August 1, 2016 at 8:06

    Plastic is ubiquitous. It’s in our clothing, our shoes, our phone, our furniture. We store food in it, we eat and drink from it, we sit on it, we brush our teeth with it. It comes in all colours, shapes and sizes. The reason plastic is ever-present? It’s cheap, it’s convenient, and it lastsBut plastic comes at a cost: plastic pollution.

    On average, a plastic bag is used for 12 minutes before it’s thrown away, but it takes anywhere between 400 to 1,000 years to degrade. That’s plenty of time to wreak havoc on our marine life – 30% of the world’s turtles and 90% of seabird species have now ingested plastic debris.

    trash

    Plastic-free July highlighted problems associated with single-use plastic, and challenges us to avoid plastic for a day, a week, or even a whole month. Unsurprisingly, going... Read more >

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