31 October 2012

This isn't just detox, it's M&S detox

Marks & Spencer takes toxic chemicals out of clothing

Encouraging a fashion behemoth to change the way it produces clothing is no small task. But armed with the facts and the collective power of supporters like you, we are able to achieve the sort of success story we are announcing today.
Which is that Marks & Spencer has committed to eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals throughout its entire supply chain and products by 2020.
As part of its commitment, M&S has taken an important step to phase out all perfluorocarbons (PFCs) by no later than 1 July 2016, acknowledging that the entire chemical group – which makes clothing stain and water resistant – is hazardous. As a significant user of PFCs, Marks and Spencer’s move to eliminate this entire chemical group sends a clear message to the whole industry, including the chemical companies, that it’s time to phase out this group of chemicals.
Aside from the ban on PFCs, M&S has also reinforced a ban on APEOs (a family of chemicals, some of which are banned in the EU), and has pledged to set timelines to eliminate other priority hazardous chemicals.
In addition to this, the company has promised to become more transparent about what its suppliers are dumping into our water and will start by releasing discharge data from five of their Chinese suppliers. This is an important pilot that they should look to expand to all facilities in the near future, as both the people living near the factories and the brands’ consumers have a right-to-know what is being released into their water.
What’s next?
M&S is now the seventh brand to make a credible commitment to clean up its supply chain and products and eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals, joining Puma, Nike, Adidas, H&M, C&A and Li-Ning. More brands need to respond to the urgency of the situation and take ambitious action to rid the fashion world and our precious water supplies of toxic chemicals.
The black list of 11 hazardous chemical groups that we ask brands to eliminate first is just the beginning. Work needs to be done checking all chemicals used in textile manufacturing, identifying hazardous ones and substituting them with safer alternatives, so their releases into the environment stop. This is a big task even with a deadline of 2020.
We need action now. The textile industry is poisoning waterways around the world with hazardous, persistent and hormone-disrupting chemicals and treating our public waterways like private sewers. M&S has now shown other brands how quickly big brands can actually act. Let’s demand brands to stop stalling and take the Detox challenge!

The latest updates

 

Greenpeace ship confronts oil exploration vessel in the Russian Arctic

Feature story | 13 August, 2013 at 13:49

The Greenpeace icebreaker Arctic Sunrise is confronting a seismic vessel in the Barents Sea north of Russia, protesting the Russian oil giant Rosneft as it prepares to drill for oil in the fragile Arctic.

Greenpeace examined the Moskva River

Feature story | 27 June, 2013 at 19:50

Last week, Greenpeace Water Patrol was working on the rivers of Moscow. During 5 days Greenpeace boats with experts on board sailed down the Moskva River and Yauza River and examined wastewaters discharged by enterprises. The results of analysis...

Disastrous oil spill in Komi region could have been avoided

Feature story | 20 June, 2013 at 13:45

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev supported on Tuesday Greenpeace’s idea to introduce criminal punishment for concealing oil spills.

Politicking and World Heritage

Feature story | 20 June, 2013 at 10:55

Due to the observations of Greenpeace representative the 37th session of the World Heritage Committee has been turned into the “political show” that does not allow to discuss constructively the problems of the UNESCO World Heritage properties’...

Greenpeace launched Water Patrol on the Moskva River

Feature story | 17 June, 2013 at 13:00

Today Greenpeace has launched the Water Patrol on the rivers of the capital. During one week, Greenpeace boats will be plying along the Moskva River and its tributaries and examine wastewater discharged by industrial enterprises. The results of...

How the oil industry steals our past and our future

Feature story | 14 June, 2013 at 14:19

Oil enterprises came to Western Siberia less than 50 years ago but they feel they are the only masters of the land. The native inhabitants of the taiga (Russian Boreal forest), the Khanty people, that have been living here for centuries and gave...

Daily routine of oil giant Rosneft: oil drilling=oil spilling

Feature story | 13 June, 2013 at 20:25

We are near a town called Pyt’-Yah, in the Khanty-Mansi region of Western Siberia, which sits in the middle of the oil fields of Rosneft, measured by oil reserves Rosneft is the largest public oil company in the world.

Polar Bear Mourns over his сubs near Norway’s Embassy in Moscow

Feature story | 17 May, 2013 at 16:10

Today about 13.00 a polar bear came to the Embassy of Norway in Moscow to call on Norway to stop Statoil's planned oil drilling activities in ice-covered Arctic, and in particular cancel it's dangerous cooperation with Rosneft.

Greenpeace action: Statoil and Rosneft have taken polar bears hostages

Feature story | 25 April, 2013 at 10:56 1 comment

It took police over 1 hour to move out 3 “polar bears” from the action site near Statoil office in Moscow where they protested against company’s plan to drill for oil in the Russian Arctic jointly with Rosneft. Currently the activists are in...

60 Years Beside the Radioactive River is Enough!

Feature story | 24 April, 2013 at 16:33

Greenpeace Action in Chelyabinsk: volunteer equipped with a chemical protection suit delivered to the Regional Government a letter demanding to provide the residents of contaminated areas with new safe homes.

31 - 40 of 1073 results.