Protect Paradise
Are these brands tiger-friendly?
It's time to take the Tiger Challenge...

mondelez
pandg
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colgate

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reckitt
godrej
nicegroup

loreal
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liby
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THE CHALLENGERS

Wilmar International, the world's biggest palm oil trader, announced a No Deforestation Policy. This is the sign of an industry in transformation.

The companies in our Tiger Challenge now have no excuse not to implement their own No Deforestation Policies. We challenge these companies to commit to guarantee that the palm oil they use in the products we buy is tiger-friendly.

That’s the Tiger Challenge.

The need for action is urgent. Forest destruction is pushing the as few as 400 tigers that are left in Sumatra, Indonesia, to the edge of extinction. These brands have the power to create change. It’s time they take the Tiger Challenge!

mendelez

Mondelēz International is one of the world’s largest food companies, with brands such as Cadbury, Oreo, Milka, Côte d’Or, Nabisco, Ritz, Dairy Milk, Freia and Marabou. Mondelēz has become the first company among the challengers to respond to the Tiger Challenge!

  • Mondelēz has announced they will ensure the palm oil they buy does not lead to deforestation- a good first step.
  • But Mondelēz does not make clear how they will go beyond RSPO to ensure no deforestation enters their supply chain.
  • Their policy also has an unambitious timeline of 2020. Greenpeace will continue to engage with Mondelēz to ensure they fully meet the Tiger Challenge.

p&g

Procter & Gamble is one of the world’s biggest producers of cosmetics, personal care products and detergents, including brands such as Ace, Tide, Dawn, Head & Shoulders, Wella and Gillette.

  • P&G’s sourcing policies do not address forest or peatland destruction
  • P&G policy relies wholly on the RSPO to ensure sustainably sourced palm oil. The RSPO cannot guarantee it is not using palm oil sourced form deforestation.
  • Less than 10% of the palm oil P&G used in 2011 was covered under the RSPO, according to the company’s communications with Greenpeace USA.

reckitt

Reckitt Benckiser is well known for home, personal care and hygiene products, including Clearasil.

  • It informed Greenpeace UK in August 2013 that while it does not have a No Deforestation policy, it does ask its suppliers to adhere to certain criteria under its own “responsible sourcing guidelines”, which still do not guarantee that its palm oil is free from forest destruction.
  • Reckitt Benckiser continues to rely on the RSPO to fulfil its sustainability commitment.
  • It aims to have 100% RSPO certified palm oil by 2015 through purchasing through Green Palm, which are certificates and not physical palm oil that the company uses. This means that Reckitt Benckiser cannot claim to know where their palm oil comes from.

colgate

Colgate Palmolive is a household name for dental care products across the world, while also producing soaps, detergents, personal care products, and pet food.

  • Colgate Palmolive wrote to Greenpeace International saying that it does not have a policy to remove forest destruction from its products, nor any plans to publicly release a No Deforestation Policy.
  • Colgate Palmolive is a member of RSPO and wholly relies on it for sourcing sustainable palm oil.
  • It has failed to meet its own deadline to source so-called sustainable palm oil through the RSPO, and instead has pushed back its deadline to 2020.

loreal

L’Oréal is the world’s biggest cosmetic company with 27 international brands such as Garnier, Maybelline, Vichy, Kiehls and ‘luxe’ brands such as Giorgio Armani Beauty and Yves Saint Laurent Beauté.

  • L'Oréal is engaging with their suppliers on deforestation, but have not committed to a policy publicly to ensure that there is no deforestation in their supply chains.
  • L'Oréal continues to rely on the RSPO to meet their sustainability commitments.

liby

Guangzhou Liby is a privately owned Chinese company selling a range of homecare, detergents and personal care products in China and internationally. Its brands include Liby, Chaowei and Lantian.

  • Although a Consumer Goods Forum (CGF) member, Liby does not have a public No Deforestation Policy, nor has it a sourcing policy to ensure its products are free from forest destruction.
  • Liby is not a RSPO member.
  • In response to Greenpeace East Asia, Liby stated that it does not consider deforestation to be an environmental risk to their palm oil supply chain.

liby

Zhejiang Nice Group is a privately owned company and one of China’s top three detergent and toothpaste producers. Its bestselling brands include Diao, Nice and Chaoneng.

  • Nice Group does not have a public No Deforestation Policy and nor is it a RSPO member.
  • In response to Greenpeace East Asia, Nice stated that it does not consider deforestation to be an environmental risk to their palm oil supply chain.

liby

Godrej is a RSPO member and relies wholly on the RSPO to source whatever sustainable palm oil they buy. The RSPO cannot guarantee it is not using palm oil sourced from deforestation

  • Godrej is a RSPO member and relies wholly on the RSPO to source whatever sustainable palm oil they buy. The RSPO cannot guarantee it is not using palm oil sourced form deforestation.
  • According to a letter Godrej sent to Greenpeace India in June 2013, it only buys through Green Palm, which are certificates and not physical palm oil that the company uses. This means that Godrej cannot claim to know where their palm oil comes from.
  • Godrej does not have additional criteria to remove forest destruction from its products, nor any plans to publicly release a No Deforestation Policy.

Why only these companies?

This is a first selection of eight global consumer companies that Greenpeace has looked into. Most of these companies are members of the Consumer Goods Forum (CGF) – a group of companies working to remove forest destruction from their supply chains by 2020.

They are also household names with the power to help transform the palm oil industry.

Zhejiang Nice and Godrej have been added as they are key players in markets with the largest use of palm oil - China and India.

Many of these companies are relying on the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil’s (RSPO) certification scheme to meet what sustainability commitments they may have, but RSPO standards fail to ban forest destruction and peatland conversion. If these brands are serious about removing forest destruction from their products, then they must immediately commit to a No Deforestation Policy.

If companies do not implement a No Deforestation policy, then the companies in this Tiger Challenge cannot guarantee their products are not linked to forest destruction.

There are solutions.

Companies must follow the example of Nestlé, who are already implementing a No Deforestation policy, and Unilever and Ferrero, who have made No Deforestation commitments. Palm oil does not need to be linked to forest destruction and big brands can lead the way in protecting Indonesia’s forests.

Find out more here.

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