Rainbow Warrior in full sail off Honolulu, Hawaii.

GREENPEACE began with a small group of individuals who decided to get together to protest against nuclear testing at Amchitka, off the west coast of Alaska. They went on to form GREENPEACE and later initiated campaigns on major environmental issues. One of the founding principles of GREENPEACE is to "bear witness" - that is to watch and record environmental destruction. This principle of direct action together with peaceful confrontation, has been the cornerstone of GREENPEACE's campaigns.Southeast Asia is of enormous significance to the future of the planet earth. The rich natural heritage of the region is worth protecting in its own right. However, the staggeringly rapid industrialization and economic growth of the past 30 years has come at a huge environmental cost. The environmental impacts of the region also stretch beyond their own national boundaries. Severe environmental degradation already exists across Southeast Asia. Apart from the recent Asian financial crisis, pollution and resources destruction are further intensifying as multinational companies and industrialized nations target the region for the expansion of their environmentally destructive operations and technologies. Reinforcing these problems is the lack of awareness among the Asian public about environmental destruction and weak democratic mechanisms to empower communities to influence decisions. Recognizing the importance of the developmental potential and threats in these areas, and in order to consolidate and expand its campaign work in Southeast Asia, Greenpeace is increasing its activities in the region.

Greenpeace is already active in many part of Asia. Our work in the region has included stopping hazardous waste imports, opposing radioactive shipments, campaigning against forest destruction, lobbying governments on sustainable energy issues and drawing attention to the dangers of waste incinerations. Often working with other local groups, Greenpeace has run successful campaigns in the Philippines, Taiwan, India, and Indonesia. We made a commitment to develop a presence in Asia in late 80s and early 90s, and first established an office in Japan (1989) and then China (1997). Initial investigations were also initiated in SEA, focusing primarily on Indonesia and Philippines.

Southeast Asia is in a key position to determine global environmental security. Over the past 30 years, Greenpeace has successfully campaigned in industrialized countries to reduce and eliminate environmental pollution and degradation. However, these efforts and many achievements can easily be reversed as these same multinational companies export dirty technologies resulting in environmental degradation in the region. Hence, after many years of investigations and establishing campaign presence in key countries, Greenpeace finally succeeded in opening an office in the region. Greenpeace Southeast Asia was formally established on March 1, 2000.

Greenpeace Southeast Asia's Mission Statement

 

" Safeguard environmental rights,
Expose and stop environmental crimes,
Advance clean development. "

2008 Greenpeace Southeast Asia Annual Report

  (click to see .pdf)

The latest updates

 

Stopping Thai Union from trashing our seas


Blog entry by Arifsyah Nasution | May 17, 2016

I’m onboard the Greenpeace ship, the Esperanza, in the Western Indian Ocean on an important tuna quest. Tuna is probably the most popular seafood commodity out there. People eat it for a number of reasons, mostly as a convenient and...

Look in the Mirror: Love or the devil on this fateful May day?

Blog entry by JP Agcaoili | April 30, 2016

“May Day Eve”, the short story written by the late Nick Joaquin, National Artist for Literature, is premised on an old custom which says that if you hold a candle up to a mirror on May Day Eve (the evening of May 1) and chant a certain...

Performing the Mutya: A re-enchantment of our times

Blog entry by Rina Angela Corpus | April 28, 2016

The Mutya is a mythical character in Tagalog legends, a river-goddess and protector of our waters, especially the Ilog Pasig. Based on Dr. Grace Odal’s cultural research , the Mutya is also a transcendent symbol of Inang Lupa , or...

Exxon and its terrible, horrible, no good, very bad week

Blog entry by Naomi Ages | March 31, 2016

It’s been a great week for the movement calling out Exxon’s colossal climate denial operation, but the world’s largest private oil company isn’t having as much fun. First, the Rockefeller Family Fund (RFF) announced it would divest...

Seventeen Attorneys General Joint Climate Announcement

Blog entry by Rodrigo Estrada Patiño | March 30, 2016

Today, seventeen Attorneys General announced their mutual commitment to collaborate on climate change related actions. Greenpeace USA Executive Director Annie Leonard said in response: “This is a clear demonstration of climate...

All We Need Is Less

Blog entry by Abi Aguilar | March 26, 2016

Our level of consumption and wastage has reached unprecedented levels, and it is alarming.  We are taking more from nature than we give back. This is evidenced by what Pope Francis says in his Laudato Si: “the exploitation of the...

We are called to reflect on our purpose and actions toward the environment

Blog entry by Diah Abida | March 24, 2016

Today, Maundy Thursday, marks the beginning of Paschal Triduum, which concludes on Easter Sunday. In the liturgical calendar, it is a three-day period for reflecting on the passion, death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. ...

International Women's Day 2016: Celebrating bravery, celebrating ourselves

Blog entry by Angelica Carballo-Pago | March 8, 2016

I have always believed that the women’s movement was created because we have so much to give, and not so much for the things we will receive. Before the term gender equality was even coined, many women already have made strides to...

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