Global Warming

Global Warming is a Catastrophe Coming! We already know the causes - humankind's unfettered burning of fossil fuels like coal, oil and gas. We already know some of the impacts - the melting of polar ice caps, rising oceans, severe droughts, the spread of pestilence, massive flooding, coral bleaching and surging storms. We already know who will be hit hardest - coastal countries, island nations, and underdeveloped regions like Southeast Asia. Read more

Genetic Engineering

Only a couple of decades ago, genetically modified organisms (GMO) would have been something out of science fiction. In the not so distant past, we never imagined we would find on our dinner tables strawberries with fish genes, corn with bacterial genes, and soybeans with built-in herbicides. Little did we know that such scenes would turn into reality in a dizzyingly short period of time. But this is now part of today's reality.Read more

Toxics

Rapid industrialization has made Southeast Asia one of the most dynamic regions in the world. The development of the region, however, has come at the expense of causing severe environmental damage. Pollution, particularly in urban and industrial areas, has reached alarming proportions. Major cities in the region like Bangkok, Jakarta and Manila are among the most polluted cities in the world today. Read more

Forests

Throughout the world, ancient forests are in crisis. Many of the plants and animals that live in these forests face extinction. And many of the people and cultures who depend on these forests for their way of life are also under threat. But the news is not all bad. There is a last chance to protect these forests and the life they support. Read more

The latest updates

 

Climate Litigations: Opening new fronts in the battle for climate justice

Blog entry by Jenny Tuazon | June 22, 2016

Recent climate research identifying the major contributors of greenhouse gas emission polluting our atmosphere has opened up new possibilities in the realm of demanding justice for people and communities who have become the most...

A Father's Day

Blog entry by Francisco Noveda | June 19, 2016

“A bus ride will take you two to three hours, stuck in traffic during peak hours.” “As if for a blockbuster movie, snaking lines of people patiently queue to ride public transport.” “Thousands of smoke-belching vehicles snail...

Healthy Oceans, Healthy Seatizens, Healthy Planet

Blog entry by Vince Cinches | June 8, 2016

Summer has gone but most of us are left with stories to tell about our Instagram-worthy love affairs with the ocean: the massive surfing waves, the vibrant underwater world, the fine white beaches, the secret lagoons, and the hundreds...

The Challenge of Change

Blog entry by Angelica Carballo-Pago | June 4, 2016

So, the Presidential elections were done; our votes have been marked, counted, and declared. Filipinos want change. Congratulations, Mr. Rody Duterte, for challenging us to step out of our comfort zones and to try something new – be it...

What pictures will my children be taking for future World Environment Days?

Blog entry by Grace Duran-Cabus | June 3, 2016

In 2009, I became the Southeast Asia photo editor for an environmental organization: Greenpeace. It wasn’t easy for me, since I knew I will be working with many professional photographers working in different countries, with different...

Stopping Thai Union from trashing our seas


Blog entry by Arifsyah Nasution | May 17, 2016

I’m onboard the Greenpeace ship, the Esperanza, in the Western Indian Ocean on an important tuna quest. Tuna is probably the most popular seafood commodity out there. People eat it for a number of reasons, mostly as a convenient and...

Look in the Mirror: Love or the devil on this fateful May day?

Blog entry by JP Agcaoili | April 30, 2016

“May Day Eve”, the short story written by the late Nick Joaquin, National Artist for Literature, is premised on an old custom which says that if you hold a candle up to a mirror on May Day Eve (the evening of May 1) and chant a certain...

Performing the Mutya: A re-enchantment of our times

Blog entry by Rina Angela Corpus | April 28, 2016

The Mutya is a mythical character in Tagalog legends, a river-goddess and protector of our waters, especially the Ilog Pasig. Based on Dr. Grace Odal-Devora’s (UP Manila) cultural research , the Mutya is also a transcendent symbol...

1 - 10 of 4114 results.