Photography has always been a powerful tool of communication. It is one of the new media forms that helps change perception and even the structure of society. This is proven by the photo exhibit we put up last Feb 28, 2009 at Malate Church. The exhibit stands with photos of the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster, taken by a reknown Dutch photographer, Robert Knoth, where the main focus was on people whose lives have changed drastically and dramatically because of nuclear power. As the parishioners viewed the photos, they were captured by the depressing condition of the subjects. They really took time reading the captions while parents explained to their children the grim effects of the nuclear disaster shown in the photos.

Afterwards, we attended a forum on the issue where Tessa De Ryck, Greenpeace Southeast Asia Nuclear Campaigner, is one of the guest speakers. Mr. Roland Simbulan of Nuclear Free Philippines was also there to tackle the history of BNPP and the nuclear energy in general and the reality involve in it. The audience were very attentive and concern about the issue. According to one of our colleagues, people who usually attend this monthly forum leave early but this crowd really stayed until the end. They asked a lot of questions like how other countries with nuclear power plants store their wastes, what are the alternative sources of energy to fight the impending energy shortage and what can they do to stop the House Bill 4631 (the bill proposed by Rep. Mark Cojuangco that will revive the BNPP).

I hope that as the photo exhibit travels we also gain opportunities like this to communicate to the public the issue of nuclear energy. Who knows, maybe in one of those sessions one of the congressmen who signed the bill or Mark Cojuangco himself attend and be enlightened on the reality and danger of their propose solution to climate change.

 

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