A nipa hut quitely sits amidst fields of organic rice standing witnessing hardwork and persistence of the farmers in Sitio Canaan, Barangay Crossing, Magallon, Negros Occidental. © Greenpeace/Gigie Cruz-Sy

Only a couple of decades ago, genetically modified organisms (GMO) would have been something out of science fiction. In the not so distant past, we never imagined we would find on our dinner tables strawberries with fish genes, corn with bacterial genes, and soybeans with built-in herbicides. Little did we know that such scenes would turn into reality in a dizzyingly short period of time. But this is now part of today's reality.

In the natural world, organisms develop specific desirable traits through evolution. This is usually a very slow process and driven by natural laws---not by human beings. Typically, an organism develops a color that will camouflage it from potential predators through hundreds or thousands of years of selection and adaptation. And, in the natural world, species never breed with unrelated species.

Greenpeace activists dressed to symbolize the "bul-ul", a traditional Ifugao rice guardian, carried out a protest at the Department of Agriculture in Quezon City. © Greenpeace / Joseph Agcaoili

With the advent of genetic engineering, the natural barriers between species have been broken down. Today, different species can be genetically manipulated to give rise to totally new organisms, presumably with a human-desired trait. Today, through human intervention, a fish can contain genes from a plant, and a plant can be 'shot' with genes from a bacterium. The possibilities for novel organisms are endless with this technology. They are also unpredictable and frightening.

Greenpeace is in the forefront of the campaign to oppose the release of GMOs into the environment. Greenpeace insists that because the technology is very new and imprecise, the potential ill effects on public health and on the environment are still widely unknown. The truth is no one knows for sure how these new man-made creations will affect life on planet Earth. Therefore, because there is still no scientific consensus as to long-term impact, and in accordance with the precautionary principle, it is best that no releases of GMOs into the environment be allowed.

This technology must be approached with great caution and more study! Releasing GMOs into the environment could have lasting effects that we cannot yet even imagine.

The latest updates

 

Celebrating food for life

Blog entry by Virginia Llorin | May 15, 2018

Many Catholic countries around the world today celebrate the feast of the patron saint of laborers and farmers.  In the Philippines, he is better known as San Isidro Labrador San Isidro was born to a poor family in Madrid, Spain.  He...

The boon of living sustainably, slowly according to Bukid ni Bogs

Blog entry by Angelica Carballo-Pago | April 19, 2018

Everything can be learned from ground up. These words are particularly true for Bogs Castro, a permaculture farmer who manages Bukid ni Bogs , an agroecological farming and training center that promotes sustainable organic...

Pasig City takes a fresher take on food as it joins #DietforClimate campaign

Press release | April 10, 2018 at 16:53

10 April 2018, Pasig City – Together with Greenpeace Philippines, officials from the local government of Pasig City partake on fruits and vegetables as the city embarks on a plant-based culinary experience and takes aim not just for a healthier...

Healthier, plant-based foods should be made more available for the benefit of people...

Press release | March 6, 2018 at 16:13

6 March 2018, Amsterdam – According to a new study, healthier, plant-based foods should be made more available to consumers while at the same time loosening the grip of industrial animal agriculture on our food systems by helping farmers shift...

Mga Mandirigma ng Balangaw: Meet our volunteers on board

Blog entry by Rattanasiri Kittikongnapang | March 3, 2018

I am now aboard Greenpeace’s most iconic ship, the Rainbow Warrior, in Tacloban in Eastern Visayas, the region of the Philippines hit hardest by super-typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) in 2013, and the last stop on the Philippine leg of its...

Rainbow Warrior sparks hope in Manila

Blog entry by Amalie Obusan | February 20, 2018

I last sailed with the Rainbow Warrior in the Philippines in December 2010.  She arrived in the Philippines on the last leg of the “ Turn the Tide ” tour, where she challenged then President Benigno Aquino III to commit to a 50%...

Eat Healthy, Fight Climate Change!

Press release | February 15, 2018 at 13:50

A healthy diet equals a healthy environment.

Greenpeace flagship Rainbow Warrior to highlight Filipinos’ calls for climate justice

Press release | February 10, 2018 at 20:07

07 February 2018, Manila, Philippines – This year, Greenpeace’s most iconic ship, the Rainbow Warrior, will set sail in the Philippines on a 20-day journey in the name of the countless communities who are fighting for Climate Justice. The...

2017: A Year in Photos

Blog entry by Jenny Tuazon | December 22, 2017

We knew what we needed to do in 2017. We turned our sentiments into action. We resisted and persisted. Our campaigns gained ground and we were taught valuable lessons as we spoke truth to power. It's time now for us to take stock of...

Groups call on countries to protect whale sharks at CMS, urges PH government to...

Press release | October 23, 2017 at 10:16

23 October 2017, Manila, Philippines – Marine conservation groups today called on the world’s nations to ensure protection of whale sharks and wedgefish when the Twelfth Session of the Conference of Parties (CoP) to the Convention on the...

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