A nipa hut quitely sits amidst fields of organic rice standing witnessing hardwork and persistence of the farmers in Sitio Canaan, Barangay Crossing, Magallon, Negros Occidental. © Greenpeace/Gigie Cruz-Sy

Only a couple of decades ago, genetically modified organisms (GMO) would have been something out of science fiction. In the not so distant past, we never imagined we would find on our dinner tables strawberries with fish genes, corn with bacterial genes, and soybeans with built-in herbicides. Little did we know that such scenes would turn into reality in a dizzyingly short period of time. But this is now part of today's reality.

In the natural world, organisms develop specific desirable traits through evolution. This is usually a very slow process and driven by natural laws---not by human beings. Typically, an organism develops a color that will camouflage it from potential predators through hundreds or thousands of years of selection and adaptation. And, in the natural world, species never breed with unrelated species.

Greenpeace activists dressed to symbolize the "bul-ul", a traditional Ifugao rice guardian, carried out a protest at the Department of Agriculture in Quezon City. © Greenpeace / Joseph Agcaoili

With the advent of genetic engineering, the natural barriers between species have been broken down. Today, different species can be genetically manipulated to give rise to totally new organisms, presumably with a human-desired trait. Today, through human intervention, a fish can contain genes from a plant, and a plant can be 'shot' with genes from a bacterium. The possibilities for novel organisms are endless with this technology. They are also unpredictable and frightening.

Greenpeace is in the forefront of the campaign to oppose the release of GMOs into the environment. Greenpeace insists that because the technology is very new and imprecise, the potential ill effects on public health and on the environment are still widely unknown. The truth is no one knows for sure how these new man-made creations will affect life on planet Earth. Therefore, because there is still no scientific consensus as to long-term impact, and in accordance with the precautionary principle, it is best that no releases of GMOs into the environment be allowed.

This technology must be approached with great caution and more study! Releasing GMOs into the environment could have lasting effects that we cannot yet even imagine.

The latest updates

 

Activists around the world challenge adidas to go “all in” for Detox

Press release | January 25, 2014 at 15:58

Quezon City, 25 January 2014-- Hundreds of Greenpeace volunteers in cities around the world have today challenged sportswear giant adidas to act upon its Detox commitment and rid its supply chain of hazardous, toxic monsters. Filipino activists...

New study finds toxic monsters lurking in children’s clothing

Press release | January 14, 2014 at 16:38

Beijing/Manila, 14 January 2014—Hazardous chemicals have been found in children’s clothes and shoes made by major brands including Disney, Burberry and adidas, according to a new investigation released today by Greenpeace East Asia [1].

'Golden' rice ignores the risks, the people, and the real solutions

Blog entry by Daniel Ocampo | January 9, 2014

'Golden' rice is being promoted by GM advocates as a solution to malnutrition. But it should be for the 'target populations' in the Philippines and elsewhere to decide whether to accept the technology - and they don't want it! ...

There is power in connectivity

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | December 30, 2013

A snapshot of the year that came to pass and the wonderful things that Greenpeace were able to accomplish would not have been possible if not for your generous extension of your time, skills and resources to help us make our vision of...

Greenpeace Philippines' Top 12 Facebook Posts of 2013

Blog entry by Jenny Tuazon | December 28, 2013

We are truly grateful to all our friends on Facebook who have shown continuing support to our campaigns through liking, sharing and commenting to every post that we share. This year is a blast for Greenpeace Philippines Facebook page ...

Green Holiday Tips

Feature story | December 20, 2013 at 13:30

The holidays are a time for family and celebration and these festivities also negatively impact the environment. From the millions decorations that must be disposed of, to the tons of gift wrappers and increase in energy usage to keep the colored...

Bicol communities winning battles against illegal commercial fishing

Press release | December 13, 2013 at 11:53

Legazpi City, 13 December 2013--Bicol communities are on their way to winning their battle against illegal fishing, a joint team of stakeholders and NGOs said today in a press conference in Legazpi City.

Countries leave Pacific tuna commission with license to overfish

Press release | December 7, 2013 at 12:17

Cairns, Australia – The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission 10th meeting ended with a deadlock over conservation and management measures needed to reverse overfishing of the region’s bigeye tuna stocks. As a result, the meeting...

Supreme Court dismisses industry lobby group appeal to intervene on Writ of Kalikasan...

Press release | December 4, 2013 at 16:06

Manila — Greenpeace today welcomed the Supreme Court’s resolution to dismiss with finality the appeal of a GMO lobby group to intervene in the Writ of Kalikasan case against genetically-engineered Bt eggplant field trials. The appeal was filed by...

Greenpeace urges Cairns tuna summit to end overfishing and control fleets

Press release | December 1, 2013 at 11:57

Suva, Fiji - Greenpeace activists today deployed a floating banner at a port in the Pacific, reading: “WCPFC Act Now! Fewer boats, more fish”. This message is directed at the members of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC)...

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