A nipa hut quitely sits amidst fields of organic rice standing witnessing hardwork and persistence of the farmers in Sitio Canaan, Barangay Crossing, Magallon, Negros Occidental. © Greenpeace/Gigie Cruz-Sy

Only a couple of decades ago, genetically modified organisms (GMO) would have been something out of science fiction. In the not so distant past, we never imagined we would find on our dinner tables strawberries with fish genes, corn with bacterial genes, and soybeans with built-in herbicides. Little did we know that such scenes would turn into reality in a dizzyingly short period of time. But this is now part of today's reality.

In the natural world, organisms develop specific desirable traits through evolution. This is usually a very slow process and driven by natural laws---not by human beings. Typically, an organism develops a color that will camouflage it from potential predators through hundreds or thousands of years of selection and adaptation. And, in the natural world, species never breed with unrelated species.

Greenpeace activists dressed to symbolize the "bul-ul", a traditional Ifugao rice guardian, carried out a protest at the Department of Agriculture in Quezon City. © Greenpeace / Joseph Agcaoili

With the advent of genetic engineering, the natural barriers between species have been broken down. Today, different species can be genetically manipulated to give rise to totally new organisms, presumably with a human-desired trait. Today, through human intervention, a fish can contain genes from a plant, and a plant can be 'shot' with genes from a bacterium. The possibilities for novel organisms are endless with this technology. They are also unpredictable and frightening.

Greenpeace is in the forefront of the campaign to oppose the release of GMOs into the environment. Greenpeace insists that because the technology is very new and imprecise, the potential ill effects on public health and on the environment are still widely unknown. The truth is no one knows for sure how these new man-made creations will affect life on planet Earth. Therefore, because there is still no scientific consensus as to long-term impact, and in accordance with the precautionary principle, it is best that no releases of GMOs into the environment be allowed.

This technology must be approached with great caution and more study! Releasing GMOs into the environment could have lasting effects that we cannot yet even imagine.

The latest updates

 

Choosing the path of organic agriculture

Blog entry by Daniel Ocampo | October 22, 2013 1 comment

Last week, I went to the 10 th  National Organic Agriculture Congress attended by around 3000 participants from farmers to government officials, NGOs, producers and the business sector at the Philippine International Convention Center...

Fear of food

Blog entry by Johanna Fernandez | October 16, 2013

I’d never been one to put a lot of thought into what I eat. It used to be that much of the “thinking” happened in calling to mind what I’m craving for, how much money’s in my pocket, or what’s most accessible at a given moment.

Ecological Agriculture: the future of food production

Blog entry by Daniel Ocampo | October 16, 2013

Time and again we have heard that business as usual is compromising the health of our environment which then has a profound impact on human health and well-being.  The way humans have unceasingly poisoned our soils, water and air...

Greenpeace wants Congress to investigate GMO regulation

Press release | October 16, 2013 at 13:36

Quezon City, Philippines 16 October 2013 – Today on World Food Day, Greenpeace activists rallied at the House of Representatives, carrying banners reading “Investigate GMO Regulation” and “I want GMO-free foods”. They urged Congress to...

Stop wasting money on GMOs, support ecological organic farming, government told

Press release | October 1, 2013 at 11:44

Manila, Philippines -– Following the Resolution issued by the Court of Appeals (CA) that granted with finality the Writ of Kalikasan against Bt talong field testings, Greenpeace and other civil society groups calls on the government to implement...

Greenpeace, et al won Bt Talong’s last legal battle at the appellate court level

Press release | September 29, 2013 at 13:30

Manila, Philippines – After one year and five months of legal battle on the Writ of Kalikasan against Bt Talong field trials, the Court of Appeals (CA) affirmed its earlier decision that uphold the right of Filipinos to a healthy and balanced...

Greenpeace report shows how RE could lift ASEAN nations out of poverty and halt...

Press release | September 24, 2013 at 10:30

Bali, Indonesia, 24th of September 2013 – Greenpeace Southeast Asia today launched a comprehensive report that illustrates how renewable energy could benefit the economies and save the climate environments of the 10-member countries of the...

Arctic sea ice reaches minimum extent for 2013 as Greenpeace activists are held in...

Press release | September 21, 2013 at 16:12

Amsterdam, 20th September 2013 - US Scientists have announced that Arctic sea ice appears to have reached its sixth lowest extent in recorded history this year. The news comes as 30 Greenpeace activists remain in the custody of Russian security...

Greenpeace advocates for the rights of Filipinos not corporations

Blog entry by Von Hernandez | August 12, 2013

Over the past few weeks, there has been a series of articles claiming that Greenpeace is anti-science, that we oppose development and - even more outlandishly - that we are puppets whose strings are being pulled by European paymasters.

Greenpeace to FDA: There is no proof that GMOs are safe

Press release | July 5, 2013 at 12:32

Manila — Greenpeace today rubbished claims made by the Food and Drug Administration that genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in the market “have met international food standards and are safe as and as nutritious as the food derived from...

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