A nipa hut quitely sits amidst fields of organic rice standing witnessing hardwork and persistence of the farmers in Sitio Canaan, Barangay Crossing, Magallon, Negros Occidental. © Greenpeace/Gigie Cruz-Sy

Only a couple of decades ago, genetically modified organisms (GMO) would have been something out of science fiction. In the not so distant past, we never imagined we would find on our dinner tables strawberries with fish genes, corn with bacterial genes, and soybeans with built-in herbicides. Little did we know that such scenes would turn into reality in a dizzyingly short period of time. But this is now part of today's reality.

In the natural world, organisms develop specific desirable traits through evolution. This is usually a very slow process and driven by natural laws---not by human beings. Typically, an organism develops a color that will camouflage it from potential predators through hundreds or thousands of years of selection and adaptation. And, in the natural world, species never breed with unrelated species.

Greenpeace activists dressed to symbolize the "bul-ul", a traditional Ifugao rice guardian, carried out a protest at the Department of Agriculture in Quezon City. © Greenpeace / Joseph Agcaoili

With the advent of genetic engineering, the natural barriers between species have been broken down. Today, different species can be genetically manipulated to give rise to totally new organisms, presumably with a human-desired trait. Today, through human intervention, a fish can contain genes from a plant, and a plant can be 'shot' with genes from a bacterium. The possibilities for novel organisms are endless with this technology. They are also unpredictable and frightening.

Greenpeace is in the forefront of the campaign to oppose the release of GMOs into the environment. Greenpeace insists that because the technology is very new and imprecise, the potential ill effects on public health and on the environment are still widely unknown. The truth is no one knows for sure how these new man-made creations will affect life on planet Earth. Therefore, because there is still no scientific consensus as to long-term impact, and in accordance with the precautionary principle, it is best that no releases of GMOs into the environment be allowed.

This technology must be approached with great caution and more study! Releasing GMOs into the environment could have lasting effects that we cannot yet even imagine.

The latest updates

 

Mothers show their activist side on World Environment Day

Press release | June 5, 2013 at 14:37

Quezon City – On World Environment Day, more than a hundred members of Green Moms, a nationwide coalition of mothers advocating for organic foods and breastfeeding practices, staged a creative protest to demonstrate their strong opposition to a...

When will governments learn that GE crops are uncontrollable?

Blog entry by Janet Cotter | June 1, 2013

Shockwaves are being felt across the world's wheat markets following the first-ever discovery of unauthorised genetically engineered wheat growing on a US farm – a development that gives further proof that GE crops cannot be controlled...

Greenpeace commends Court ruling to stop field trials of Bt talong

Press release | May 24, 2013 at 11:36

Greenpeace welcomes the ruling issued by the Court of Appeals that granted the ‘Writ of Kalikasan’ to stop the field trials of Bt eggplant. In their decision, the court ordered the respondents to ‘permanently cease and desist from further...

The perfect design

Blog entry by Johanna Fernandez | May 22, 2013

Four years ago, amidst real estate developers’ promises of nature and symptoms of poor urban planning, I found myself musing over mankind’s obsession with progress. This never ending pursuit for an easier way of doing things even moved...

Green Moms demand GMO-free foods for their families

Press release | May 11, 2013 at 15:18

Manila, 12 May 2013 – Mothers know best. This Mother’s Day, concerned breastfeeding moms and children’s advocates came together to call on the Philippine government to stop the approval of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), such as Golden...

Environmental groups lament this year’s “green” survey results

Press release | May 11, 2013 at 14:24

Manila -- The results are in. A survey conducted by environmental groups for the Green Electoral Initiative (GEI)[1] 2013 resulted in a very poor response rate from senatorial candidates. Out of the 33 senatorial candidates, only six -- or a...

Botong Lunhaw (Green Vote)

Blog entry by Jenny Tuazon | May 4, 2013

Yesterday, we received a lovely poem written by Jason Occidental, a 5th year BS Computer Engineering student at Ateneo de Davao University. According to Jason, he got so inspired after attending the "Berde Ka Ba?", a Green Electoral...

Oriental Mindoro: GMOs, Keep Out!

Blog entry by Daniel Ocampo | March 7, 2013

Last January, I was invited again in Oriental Mindoro by our local partners to help them in their protest against the plans to plant GMOs in the province despite the existing ban in the province. Going back there reminded me of the...

Making up for lost time

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | February 25, 2013

The pronouncement that February 25 is a working holiday is a clear indication that the significance of the first EDSA People Power Revolution is no longer in the collective consciousness of many Filipinos in recent years. I cannot...

GMO-free Mindoro fights back

Blog entry by Daniel Ocampo | January 24, 2013

Even before the year started, I was already informed that there are moves from some sectors to reintroduce GM corn in the province of Oriental Mindoro despite provincial ordinance banning its propagation. This move is coming from...

51 - 60 of 125 results.

Categories