Defending our Oceans

Seen from space the Earth is covered in a blue mantle. It is a planet on which the continents are dwarfed by the oceans surrounding them and the immensity of the marine realm.

A staggering 80 percent of all the life on Earth is to be found hidden beneath the waves and this vast global ocean pulses around our world driving the natural forces which maintain life on our planet.

The oceans provide vital sources of protein, energy, minerals and other products of use the world over and the rolling of the sea across the planet creates over half our oxygen, drives weather systems and natural flows of energy and nutrients around the world, transports water masses many times greater than all the rivers on land combined and keeps the Earth habitable.

Without the global ocean there would be no life on Earth.

It is gravely worrying, then, that we are damaging the oceans on a scale that is unimaginable to most people.

We now know that human activity can have serious impacts on the vital forces governing our planet. We have fundamentally changed our global climate and are just beginning to understand the consequences of that.

As yet largely unseen, but just as serious, are the impacts we are having on the oceans.

A healthy ocean has diverse ecosystems and robust habitats.  The actual state of our oceans is a far cry from this natural norm.

A myriad of human pressures are being exerted both directly and indirectly on ocean ecosystems the world over. Consequently ecosystems are collapsing as marine species are driven towards extinction and ocean habitats are destroyed.  Degraded and stripped of their diversity, ocean ecosystems are losing their inherent resilience.

We need to defend our oceans because without them, life on Earth cannot exist.

Dead oceans, dead planet

We need to defend them now more than ever, because the oceans need all the resilience they can muster in the face of climate change and the potentially disasterous impacts this is already beginning to produce in the marine world.

The Greenpeace Defending our Oceans campaign sets out to protect and preserve our oceans now and for the future by setting aside swathes of the global oceans from exploitation and controllable human pressure, allowing these areas the respite they so desperately need for recovery and renewal.

Building on a protection and recovery system established to manage land based over-exploitation, Marine Reserves are the ocean equivalent of national parks.
Marine Reserves are a scientifically developed and endorsed approach to redressing the crisis in our oceans which work alongside a range of other measures designed to ensure that the demands we make of our oceans are managed sustainably.

Beyond Marine Reserves we need to tackle a great many threats to the oceans' viability and find better ways of managing their resources.  To this end, while Greenpeace campaigns for Marine Reserves, we also campaign against the acts which have brought the oceans to this point - we expose the countless pressures, reveal the threats, confront the villains and point to the solutions and measures necessary to create sustainable oceans.

Defending our oceans

Fundamental changes need to be made in the way our oceans are managed. This means that we must act to make sure that human activities are sustainable, in other words that they meet human needs of current and future generations without causing harm to the environment.

Accordingly, governments must set aside 40 percent of our oceans as marine reserves. Marine reserves can be defined as areas of the ocean in which the exploitation of all living resources is prevented, together with the exploitation of non-living resources such as sand and gravel and other minerals.

The latest updates

 

Justice for fellow ocean defender, Gerlie Menchie Alpajora

Blog entry by Vince Cinches | August 15, 2015

I always admire people at the frontline, actively confronting the threats happening in their backyard. Most of these people, the nameless thousands brave men and women, can choose to ignore dynamite fishing that their neighbors are...

Opposition of commercial fishers to the amended fisheries law could bring the country...

Press release | July 24, 2015 at 13:21

Manila— A protest called Fishing Holiday orchestrated by some traders and commercial fishing operations in Manila Bay on Thursday morning showed that the main actors responsible for emptying our seas don’t want illegal fishing to end. The...

For the love of sharks

Blog entry by Dennis Bryan Bait-it, guest blogger | July 10, 2015

It all started with a great ocean view. Gary Cases, a seasoned scuba instructor and a dive shop owner in Malapascua had been toying with the idea of setting up a marine sanctuary ever since he first set foot on island, seeing there was...

It’s official! United Nations decide to develop a High Seas Biodiversity Agreement

Blog entry by Sofia Tsenikli | June 20, 2015

No reason to deny it – making it official makes things a tad more real! Today the United Nations General Assembly formally decided to develop a High Seas Biodiversity Agreement, endorsing  the breakthrough outcome  of the UN...

We are the stakeholders of our oceans and seas

Blog entry by Vince Cinches | May 11, 2015

May is the time of the year when summer is in full swing, when most Filipinos flock to the beach, or go to remote island destinations still under the radar of travel magazines. After all, we are a nation of more than 7,107 picturesque...

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