Actor John C. Reilly Returns to Oregon to Campaign for Greater Protection of U.S. Public Lands

 

Media release - June 9, 2004
Actor John C. Reilly returned to the banks of the Rogue River in Southern Oregon today, not to film a movie this time, but instead to call for greater protection and restoration of ancient forests on U.S. public lands. Reilly, who became familiar with the Wild and Scenic Rogue River while shooting the film The River Wild, spoke at a press conference along with a local river rafting guide and representatives of Greenpeace.

Star of Chicago and The River Wild Takes a Stand for Ancient Forests and Healthy Economies

Medford, Ore. -- Actor John C. Reilly returned to the banks of the Rogue River in Southern Oregon today, not to film a movie this time, but instead to call for greater protection and restoration of ancient forests on U.S. public lands. Reilly, who became familiar with the Wild and Scenic Rogue River while shooting the film The River Wild, spoke at a press conference along with a local river rafting guide and representatives of Greenpeace.

"I had never been to this part of the country until I made The River Wild, and I was awe-struck by the beauty of this place," said Reilly. "The Klamath-Siskiyous are some of the most magnificent forests on our public lands, and are a part of our national heritage. I want to make sure they are here for future generations to enjoy."

Reilly offered his support last week, after hearing about the opening of Greenpeace's Forest Rescue Station, located at the site of the proposed Kelsey Whiskey timber sale in the Medford District of the Bureau of Land Management. Greenpeace is collaborating closely with local communities to stop destructive logging and foster healthy economies through restoration, recreation and protection of ancient forests on public lands.

"The American people overwhelmingly support protecting ancient forests, but the Bush Administration is ignoring their wishes," said Pamela Wellner, Greenpeace Forest Campaigner. "This administration has been liquidating forests on our public lands at taxpayer expense. Americans must demand that their tax dollars no longer be used to fund destructive logging, but instead be used to protect and restore forests to provide long term economic and social benefits."

Reilly was joined by Joe Dapp, Operations Manager of Rogue Wilderness, Inc., who has spent a decade guiding on the Rogue River. Born and raised in Oregon, Dapp cited the importance of healthy forests to healthy rivers, and of healthy rivers to a successful recreation industry.

Recreation activities like rafting, fishing and hiking in forests on U.S. public lands provide 30 times more jobs and revenue than commercial logging. Greenpeace is a calling for an end to commercial logging in ancient forests on our public lands, and a redirection of federal funds towards restoration.



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