Greenpeace Opens First Forest Rescue Station in U.S. in Threatened Ancient Forest in Oregon

 

Media release - June 1, 2004
Local community activists joined Greenpeace today for the launch of its first U.S. Forest Rescue Station, at the site of the proposed Kelsey Whiskey timber sale, located in the Klamath-Siskiyou region of southern Oregon. The mobile Station, which is open to the public for workshops, hikes and other educational activities, is a hub for Greenpeace's campaign calling for greater protection and restoration of forests on U.S. public lands, and a moratorium to end commercial logging on our public lands.

Campaign Calls for Protection and Restoration of Forests on Public Lands Nationwide

Medford, Ore. -- Local community activists joined Greenpeace today for the launch of its first U.S. Forest Rescue Station, at the site of the proposed Kelsey Whiskey timber sale, located in the Klamath-Siskiyou region of southern Oregon. The mobile Station, which is open to the public for workshops, hikes and other educational activities, is a hub for Greenpeace's campaign calling for greater protection and restoration of forests on U.S. public lands, and a moratorium on commercial logging.

"Greenpeace has come to southern Oregon because this is a place of international significance," said Ginger Cassady, Greenpeace Forest Campaigner. "Like the Amazon, forests like these on our public lands in the U.S. must be protected and restored."

The state of the art Forest Rescue Station runs on solar power, and features two 24-foot diameter domes and a series of smaller tents. Satellite communications systems enable visitors to create and post weblogs about their experiences at the site.

The massive Kelsey Whiskey timber sale, slated for auction this summer, is located within the Bureau of Land Management's Medford District. The area is representative of hundreds of proposed timber sales on public lands across the U.S. being advanced by federal agencies despite overwhelming public opposition. Even worse, the Bush administration has stepped up its attacks on civil liberties, limiting citizen participation in oversight of public lands.

"The Bush administration has betrayed the American people by rolling back 30 years of environmental laws and cutting the public out of decision making," Cassady said. "It is time to put the 'public' back into public lands, and hold the Bush administration accountable for failing to protect our endangered forests.

"The majority of Americans don't want our centuries-old forests put on the chopping block. With so little of our ancient forests left, why is the Bush administration spending billions of taxpayer dollars to destroy our public forest lands, instead of investing in high-skill, family-wage jobs that would benefit communities and restore the land?"

Greenpeace plans to open Forest Rescue Stations in endangered forests on public lands across the country.



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