Toxic Toys Still Being Sold

Greenpeace Releases A New Report Card on PVC in Toys

Media release - February 19, 2003
On closing day of the American International Toy Fair in New York City, Greenpeace issued its latest toy report card, grading 21 major manufacturers on their use of PVC (polyvinyl chloride or vinyl) in children's and baby products.

On closing day of the American International Toy Fair in New York City, Greenpeace issued its latest toy report card, grading 21 major manufacturers on their use of PVC (polyvinyl chloride or vinyl) in children's and baby products. While the latest grades show some improvement over 2000, the results also show that the toy industry -- and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) - should be doing more to protect children from harmful additives that are used in soft PVC.

"We are pleased that several toy companies have improved their grades regarding PVC and toxic additive use," said Lisa Finaldi of Greenpeace. "Consumer pressure concerning the risks of PVC and toxic additives in toys is making a difference. Yet, there are still a handful of bad actors, including market leaders such as Hasbro, that need more pressure to do the right thing."

The report covers the nation's largest and most popular toy manufacturers and brand names, including Hasbro, Mattel, Safety First and Little Tykes. Grades are based on responses from toy companies to written and phone surveys. Out of 21 inquiries, 9 companies were given an A grade, two a B grade, three a C grade, and 2 a D grade. The rest (5) did not reply after repeated inquiries. No F grades were given this year.

Scientific studies have shown that toxic additives used in PVC, known as phthalates, which make vinyl soft and flexible, are linked to liver and kidney damage, and cancer in laboratory rats. Last month, the Centers for Disease Control released the results of a study documenting human exposure to 116 chemicals, including phthalates. The study found that children have the highest level of exposure to these toxic additives, 90% of which are used in manufacturing PVC.

Since 1996, Greenpeace has called on toy manufacturers to stop using toxic chemicals in baby products, meeting with industry officials, exposing the problem through testing of products, and raising public awareness of the problem. In November 1998, Greenpeace and other public interest organizations filed a petition with the CPSC to permanently ban PVC in children's products. While a decision has not yet been made, it is expected soon.

In response to the Greenpeace petition, in December 1998 the CPSC announced a voluntary withdrawal of teething toys containing one phthalate, but this action did not go far enough. In contrast, the European Union has had a mandatory ban on six phthalates in toys since December 1999.

"The CPSC uses its consumer protection powers to safeguard children from toys with sharp points or small parts that could choke them," said Finaldi. "The agency must protect children from chemical hazards too. It should prohibit any phthalates and PVC in children's products, instead of continuing its weak voluntary agreement with the toy industry. If the CPSC would grant our petition, every toy company in the country would have an A."

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