#FeelGoodFriday: New Jersey approves massive solar proposal, turns landfills and brownfields into solar farms

by Cassady Sharp

May 31, 2013

A man walks in solar farm. Thailand has great potential in producing solar power. Government promotion of renewable energy supports these cleaner technologies. The Thai Government has also set a National Agenda for renewable energy, which aims for 25% of the countrys energy portfolio to come from renewable sources by 2022. However, Thailand lacks the infrastructure that will truly support such high potential, like pushing for a Renewable Energy law for example, that will promote policies, increase energy security in the country by reducing energy imports, increasing energy resources, building competitive energy market for sustainable economic growth, and help reduce CO2 emissions.

© Athit Perawongmetha / Greenpeace

Solar Energy in Thailand What once was an 81-foot tall trash heap in New Jersey is now a 12,500-paneled solar farm, providing renewable energy to nearly 650 homes. And there will be plenty more where that came from. In the same week as President Obama and Governor Christie toured the recovering post-Sandy New Jersey, the Garden State approved a $446 million solar proposal. The plan is to turn many of the state's 800 closed landfills and 10,000 brownfields, closed industrial sites, into gleaming solar farms. This news from New Jersey proves that not only are global warming solutions possible, they're more urgent than ever in a state directly feeling the power of climate change. take action

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