Eliminating Toxics

The world is consuming more and more electronic products every year. This has caused a dangerous explosion in electronic scrap (e-waste) containing toxic chemicals and heavy metals that cannot be disposed of or recycled safely. But this problem can be avoided. We are pressing leading electronic companies to change; to turn back the toxic tide of e-waste.

Every year, hundreds of thousands of old computers and mobile phones are dumped in landfills or burned in smelters. Thousands more are exported, often illegally, from the Europe, US, Japan and other industrialised countries to Asia. Here, workers at scrap yards, some of whom are children, are exposed to a cocktail of toxic chemicals and poisons.

Campaign story:

Greenpeace India is working to solve e-waste crisis by pushing electronic manufacturers to accept responsibility of entire life-cycle of their products including end of the life stage. Electronic manufacturers can solve this crisis by phasing out toxic chemicals from their products at the design stage itself. This will make recycling and treatment of e-waste safer and easier. We are also working to create separate legislative framework based on producer’s responsibility.

After years of campaigning by Greenpeace and other groups, the Government finally came up with a draft for an e-waste regulation notification. Though late, the action is a step in the right direction. The finalisation and implementation of this notification will be a big achievement for this campaign.

The latest updates

 

Victory – India introduces e-waste law

Blog entry by Tom Dowdall | June 15, 2011

When we started our campaign to tackle the global e-waste crisis in 2005 we went to India  to document the terrible environmental and health effects of toxic e-waste being dumped across  Asia and Africa . Just 6 years later we have...

Wipro marches ahead of Dell and Samsung to the Toxics free punch

Feature story | February 4, 2010 at 5:30

In a classis case of David and Goliath, one of India’s biggest IT service provider (but relatively small PC manufacturing company), Wipro, has beaten giants like Dell, Samsung, Lenovo and LGE to the finish line in producing a computer, which is...

E-waste from Dell

Image | July 1, 2009 at 13:54

E-waste from Dell

E-waste from Dell

Image | July 1, 2009 at 13:54

E-waste from Dell

E-waste from Dell

Image | July 1, 2009 at 13:54

E-waste from Dell

Greenpeace activists at HP Headquarters in

Image | August 19, 2008 at 14:58

Greenpeace activists at HP Headquarters in Bangalore demand the company to lobby for e-waste legislation in India.

Greenpeace activists at HP Headquarters in

Image | August 19, 2008 at 14:58

Greenpeace activists at HP Headquarters in Bangalore demand the company to lobby for e-waste legislation in India.

Greenpeace activists at HP Headquarters in

Image | August 19, 2008 at 14:58

Greenpeace activists at HP Headquarters in Bangalore demand the company to lobby for e-waste legislation in India.

Greenpeace activists stage a protest at the

Image | August 7, 2008 at 20:08

Greenpeace activists stage a protest at the Philips office in Mumbai asking the company to immediately implement free, voluntary e-waste takeback service in India

Greenpeace activists stage a protest at the

Image | August 7, 2008 at 20:08

Greenpeace activists stage a protest at the Philips office in Mumbai asking the company to immediately implement free, voluntary e-waste takeback service in India

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