President Yudhoyono Must Act Now to Protect Kampar and Sumatran forests

Siaran Pers - 3 Juni, 2010
Jakarta, 3 June 2010 – Greenpeace today called on Indonesia’s President Yudhoyono to act to protect the millions of hectares of forests and peatland not covered by the moratorium he declared last week in Norway. Through highlighting the island of Sumatra, the environmental organisation showed evidence of devastating forest and peatland clearance by pulp and paper companies including in the Kampar Peninsula.

Kampar Peninsula in Riau, Sumatra, are still being cleared by pulp and paper giant, APRIL, despite the moratorium and the November 2009 suspension of APRIL’s permit by the Forestry Minister. Peatland forests and tiger habitat are also currently being cleared in South Sumatra and Jambi provinces by companies owned by Sinar Mas pulp arm Asia Pulp & Paper (APP).

Indonesia’s deepest peatland forests on the Kampar Peninsula in Riau, Sumatra, are still being cleared by pulp and paper giant, APRIL, despite the moratorium and the November 2009 suspension of APRIL’s permit by the Forestry Minister. Peatland forests and tiger habitat are also currently being cleared in South Sumatra and Jambi provinces by companies owned by Sinar Mas pulp arm Asia Pulp & Paper (APP).

"President Yudhoyono last week declared a two-year moratorium on new concessions on forest and peatland. However this will not save the millions hectares of forests in Sumatra that are being cleared right now.  Without intervention on existing concessions, the President cannot achieve his commitment to reduce Indonesia,s greenhouse gas emissions even by the promised 26 percent with or without international help,” said Zulfahmi, Greenpeace Southeast Asia Forests Campaigner.

For Indonesia to reduce its emissions rapidly, a moratorium must take the form of a presidential decree to stop all conversion of peatlands and forests, including both existing and new concessions. Existing, legally obtained forested concessions must be protected with options of landswaps to non-forested, degraded areas with community consent explored as alternatives.

Deli Saputra, Leader of the Community Forum to Save Kampar Peninsula (FMPKS) said, “The people of Teluk Meranti have been asking the government to stop companies from destroying our forests because our livelihoods depend on their protection”.

“Local communities like ours are the most vulnerable and will suffer if Kampar’s forests are destroyed. That’s why we praise the President’s moratorium commitment, and urge the government to act immediately to stop ongoing forests destruction,” added Deli. “We acknowledge that Indonesia receives forest protection funding from other countries, we are hoping that fund can also benefit local people.”

The moratorium is part of the agreement between Indonesia-Norway, where Norway will provide $1 billion to develop strategies to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) in Indonesia.

“These funds, plus any other agreements between Indonesia and foreign governments must be used to protect Indonesia forests and peatlands, with safeguards for Indigenous peoples and biodiversity and meaningful multi-stakeholder decision making in fund allocation,” concluded Zulfami. 

 

 

Kategori