180 results found
 

You did it! Samsung will finally recycle millions of Galaxy Note 7s

Blog entry by Jude Lee | 27 March, 2017

Remember when we did this… Greenpeace activists create satirical scenes to show the explosion of the Galaxy Note 7 as well as how the device can be recycled at the front gate of the Samsung Electronics’ headquarters in Suwon. ...

5 ways tech companies are making your devices die too soon

Blog entry by Elizabeth Jardim | 27 June, 2017 1 comment

Imagine a world where your electronic gadgets would last, or a place where your devices could be easily repaired. Imagine all the money saved!   ...But we know that world is purely imaginary, because unfortunately, the...

Greenpeace calls on Philips to take responsibility for its e-waste

Press release | 27 March, 2008 at 14:04

Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. (Philips) is failing to take responsibility for the take-back of its used products. Inadequate recycling policies are leading to e-waste dumping in the developing world, harming human health and polluting the...

Why BFRs and PVC should be phased out of electronic devices

Background | 26 February, 2010 at 15:41

Here is an in-depth explanation of two problems caused by BFR's, PVC and phthalates in electronics. This page also tackles some of the common misconceptions, assumptions or myths regarding these hazardous substances. See also Toxic Transformers...

Greener electronics Toshiba ranking: Second Edition

Publication | 6 December, 2006 at 11:07

Despite gaining extra points for some models of laptops produced without brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and EcoMark-certified products without polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Toshiba has still not committed to eliminating all uses of PVC and BFRs. ...

Greener electronics Sony ranking: Second Edition

Publication | 6 December, 2006 at 11:02

Although there is a slight increase in Sony’s overall score, it has moved down the ranking compared to other companies that have made more progress. Sony earns extra points on chemicals for its commitment to eliminate substances that are...

Greener electronics Sony Ericsson ranking: Second Edition

Publication | 6 December, 2006 at 10:59

Sony Ericsson maintains its position near the top of the ranking and gains points for committing to a timeline for substituting polyvinyl chloride (PVC). It also scores well for having products on the market that are free from the worst...

Greener electronics Samsung ranking: Second Edition

Publication | 6 December, 2006 at 10:56

Samsung gets top marks for providing a timeline for phasing out brominated flame retardants (BFRs). It loses points for providing voluntary product take back of its electronic waste only in a few countries and only for some product groups. The...

Greener electronics Panasonic ranking: Second Edition

Publication | 6 December, 2006 at 10:54

Panasonic’s overall score has improved, but it has still moved down the ranking compared to other companies that have made faster progress. Extra points have been earned for its support of the Precautionary Principle, and for its reporting of...

Greener electronics Nokia ranking: Second Edition

Publication | 6 December, 2006 at 10:52

Nokia leads the way on eliminating toxic chemicals. After eliminating PVC from their mobile range, Nokia will launch the first phones without components containing BFRs from the start of 2007. But Nokia loses points for failing to provide a clear...

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