180 results found
 

Pulling the plug on dirty electronics

Generic multimedia item | 23 May, 2005 at 2:00

Your new phone or new computer could, in a few years, end up dumped as toxic waste in Asia and scrapped by hand. Take a trip through the lifecycle of electronics products to discover the dirty secrets of electronics and solutions to the problem.

HP rises to the toxic challenge

Feature story | 9 March, 2006 at 1:00

Electronics giant Hewlett Packard has risen to the challenge we set them and committed to a phase out plan for a range of hazardous chemicals in its products. Now we are at the consumer electronics industry's biggest annual event to ask "who's...

Guide to Greener Electronics

Publication | 25 August, 2006 at 2:00

This Guide ranks leading mobile and PC manufacturers on their global policies and practice on eliminating harmful chemicals and on taking responsibility for their products once they are discarded by consumers. Companies are ranked solely on...

Your guide to green electronics

Feature story | 25 August, 2006 at 2:00

The biggest names in electronics have just sat their first global exam on their green credentials. Ranked on their use of toxic chemicals and electronic waste (e-waste) policies only Dell and Nokia scraped a barely respectable score while Apple,...

Greener electronics Toshiba ranking

Publication | 18 September, 2006 at 2:00

Despite some models of laptops produced without brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and EcoMark-certified products without polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Toshiba has not committed to eliminating all uses of PVC and BFRs. The company also loses points...

Greener electronics Sony ranking

Publication | 18 September, 2006 at 2:00

Despite having some models without the worst chemicals, Sony has yet to provide timelines for substituting toxic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) for key applications. Sony’s website makes no reference to the...

Greener electronics Sony Ericsson ranking

Publication | 18 September, 2006 at 2:00

Since the start of 2006, new Sony Ericsson models are already free of brominated flame retardants (BFRs), but they still have to announce a timeline for substituting polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The company’s website makes no reference to supporting...

Greener electronics Samsung ranking

Publication | 18 September, 2006 at 2:00

Samsung gets top marks for providing a timeline for phasing out brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and for its strong support for Individual Producer Responsibility. Samsung loses points for providing voluntary product take back of its electronic...

Greener electronics Panasonic ranking

Publication | 18 September, 2006 at 2:00

Despite very comprehensive web pages on chemicals management and the elimination of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) in some applications, Panasonic scores poorly on all the other criteria: failure to embrace the precautionary principle; no commitment to...

Greener electronics Nokia ranking

Publication | 18 September, 2006 at 2:00

Nokia leads the way on eliminating toxic chemicals. Since the end of 2005 all new models of mobiles are free of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and all new components will be free of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) from the start of 2007. Nokia loses...

1 - 10 of 180 results.

results per page
10 | 20 | 50