Clean our Cloud

As the Internet spreads around the world, it needs huge amounts of electricity, and we get to decide if that electricity should come from clean energy, like the wind turbines and solar panels we are seeing more every day.

The smartest companies in the world have made a decision to embrace the future: Google and Facebook are plugging their Internet infrastructure into the wind and sun, and now Apple is doing the same thanks to people like you who asked them to embrace clean power!

Unfortunately, other Internet companies are still stuck in the past: Microsoft and Amazon still get their power from coal power, a 19th-century fuel that causes climate change. All the companies behind the Internet can get their power from clean sources, but they won’t until they hear from you.

The latest updates

 

Merkel must help break deadlock on pre-2020 climate action at Pacific COP

Press release | 13 November, 2017 at 9:38

Bonn, Germany – 13 November 2017 – Developed countries must break a deadlock at the UN climate talks in Bonn and discuss their pre-2020 climate actions, starting with COP host German Chancellor Merkel who can lead the way, Greenpeace said.

Big oil is destructive in more ways than one

Blog entry by Bunny McDiarmid | 10 November, 2017

This September I took my first trip to Russia to join the celebration of Greenpeace Russia’s 25 Year Anniversary. In big cities like Moscow, oil powered transport is a major source of pollution and greenhouse gases emissions. This...

‘No future in fossil fuels’ - Greenpeace, Pacific activists call for climate action...

Press release | 10 November, 2017 at 7:11

Bonn, Germany, November 10, 2017 - Activists from Greenpeace in Germany and Pacific Island Represent have sent a message to leaders meeting at the UN climate talks in Bonn, projecting an image of faces onto a coal power plant and calling for an...

China's "Singles Day" clothing sales produced 258,000 tonnes of CO2 in 2016 - Greenpeace

Press release | 9 November, 2017 at 7:11

Beijing, 8 November 2017 - Apparel sales from China’s 2016 “Singles Day” internet shopping bonanza produced 258,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions -- equivalent to the CO2 absorbed by 2.58 million trees, new research from Greenpeace East Asia shows. [1]

3 reasons this small country’s court decision will have a big impact on global...

Blog entry by Kristin Casper and Kate Simcock | 7 November, 2017

Two years ago, a courageous law student, Sarah Thomson, sued the New Zealand Government over its weak climate targets. Now she’s made history. On 2 November, 2017, the High Court of New Zealand issued a game-changing ruling. It ...

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