This page has been archived, and may no longer be up to date

Greenpeace boards ship carrying PCB toxic waste.

Toxic trade

Greenpeace has documented hundreds of cases where developed countries have traded or transferred toxic waste problems to developing countries.

Instead of receiving clean technologies, too often developing countries receive toxic waste, products and technologies.

Currently the main focus of our work on toxic trade is stopping the dumping of dirty ships in Asia for shipbreaking.

This type of trade is immoral and environmentally destructive to the receiving countries and their people. It also prevents developed countries from investing in real solutions to pollution, and developing future markets in more appropriate technologies or products.

The most blatant offence has been the export of toxic wastes from developed to developing countries. Greenpeace has sought a ban on this type of toxic trade and achieved it through an international treaty called the Basel Convention.

The convention came into force in 1992 but it was a weak treaty. In 1994, a unique coalition of developing countries, and some from eastern and western Europe along with Greenpeace, managed to pass by consensus what has come to be known as the Basel Ban.

This became law in 1998 and banned waste transfer to developing countries. Greenpeace is now campaigning to:

· Prevent governments and companies circumventing the ban by practices such as ship breaking;

· Promote clean production;

· Halt the production and trade of toxic products such as the UN Environmental Programme list of the dirty dozen (the 12 most toxic persistent pollutants); and

· Stop toxic technologies such as incineration.

The latest updates

 

The wave is rolling!

Blog entry by Michelle Jonker-Argueta | 29 November, 2017 3 comments

As the People vs. Arctic Oil Trial comes to an end, the battle against climate change continues in courtrooms around the world After seven days of court hearings, the  People vs. Arctic oil trial has come to an end.  We expect...

Samsung: fuelling climate change

Blog entry by Insung Lee | 29 November, 2017 1 comment

As extreme weather increases, the world is being forced to wake up to the realities of climate change. The good news is that every day more and more people are coming together, taking action to ensure a greener future for us all.

The mysterious radioactive cloud—why the ruthenium-106 story matters

Blog entry by Jan Haverkamp, Andrey Allakhverdov | 27 November, 2017 8 comments

A week ago, the Russian meteorological service, Roshydromet, reacted to a month-long standing request for information from Greenpeace. It triggered extraordinary interest among journalists world-wide in a rather unknown bit of nuclear...

True climate leadership still missing

Blog entry by Daniel Mittler | 18 November, 2017

The world is moving ahead without Trump - but not as fast and decisively as needed. Another round of climate negotiations is over. And, like last year, President Trump has failed to stop the global climate talks from moving...

A focus on gender at the UN climate talks

Blog entry by Tatiana Nuño | 14 November, 2017

Each year at the UN climate talks, gender becomes a central thematic element in the negotiations. Today is that day, six years after the first Gender Day was incorporated into the UNFCCC. Since then, every year, COPs have not only...

26 - 30 of 14163 results.