111 results found
 

FAQ for September 14th Peaceful Disobedience

Blog entry by Andrew Tobert | September 13, 2017

If you’ve got loads of burning questions and want to know more then come along to the briefing on Wednesday, September 13th at Halo, 66B Wharenui Road.  Make sure you’re registered to get updates. How long do I have to stay?

Save Our Rivers: Peaceful Civil Disobedience

Blog entry by Andrew Tobert | September 13, 2017

Construction has started on huge irrigation schemes in Canterbury. When they start working, it’s going to be disastrous for our rivers - most of which are already struggling. More irrigation means more cows and that means more...

Thursday, September 7: Occupying Central Plains Water

Blog entry by Andrew Tobert | September 12, 2017

The day started early, or late, depending on your perspective. We met the night before in Christchurch. People had travelled from across New Zealand at a moment’s notice - one group had even driven from Dunedin. The energy was high.

Lightning Occupation of Central Plains Water

Blog entry by Genevieve Toop | September 7, 2017

We had to go for it. At the crack of dawn today, a team of our activists began an occupation of the Central Plains Water (CPW) irrigation dam. If you want to join us - we’re on Coxs Road, Springfield. Time is of the essence, and...

The dairy farmer's daughter who locked herself inside an irrigation pipe to protest...

Blog entry by Rosemary Penwarden | August 26, 2017

I'm inside a pipe on the Canterbury Plains with Olga from Greenpeace. We each have an arm secured into a tube inside a two and a half metre irrigation pipe. We're in a ditch between the Rakaia and Waimakariri Rivers. Our pipe is one of...

Cabbages and Kings.

Blog entry by pvine | August 22, 2017

Frogs will rain from the sky, a blight will cross the land, and white walkers will travel south of the wall. All this will come to pass. Oh and cabbages might cost more. That’s the tenor of the response of Irrigation New Zealand...

How much longer can we take our water for granted?

Blog entry by Amanda Larsson | June 28, 2017

The first message I sent home from New Zealand was about tap water. Sounds weird. True story. Having spent the previous five years drinking London water (you know, the kind of hard water that means endless scrubbing to get crusty...

Battle of the parodies - Fonterra answers Greenpeace video spoof with parody of its own

Blog entry by Phil Vine | June 15, 2017

“OMG - Dairy Bosses discover climate change - 20 years too late” Hot on the heels of Greenpeace’s parody video about Pure Dairy, the industry leadership has countered with a parody of its own. The Dairy Action plan 2017-2018, ...

Pure Dairy. Pure Fiction - A Parody

Blog entry by Nick Young | June 13, 2017

How Greenpeace is using satire to call out NZ Dairy Bosses on their outrageous billboard. You can't miss it. Even at night. The Fonterra billboard bores down through your windscreen with sunny insistence. It strikes you the moment...

School bullying - woeful opportunism by dairy leadership

Blog entry by Phil Vine | June 12, 2017

When farming organisations start using children as human shields you know they’ve reached a new level of desperation. I think we might have arrived at despo-con3.   Achieved when DairyNZ decided to employ school kids as a new line of...

Dairy bosses plot their own demise

Blog entry by Phil Vine | May 12, 2017

You've got to feel sorry for the dairy leadership. Well you do. They're in mourning. Grief is the only way to explain the strange and conflicting messages coming out of DairyNZ and the Federated Farmers over the last six months. Could...

Hungary and the freedom I stand for

Blog entry by Katalin Rodics | April 9, 2017

In the winter of 2017, I received a call from a colleague about a small community in the Hungarian countryside, far from the busy streets of Budapest, that needed help. A Lutheran organisation had just launched a project with disabled...

Cut the cows - a double whammy for the environment

Blog entry by pvine | March 27, 2017

It’s often said that domestic opinion doesn’t count for much in this country. Watch though, as heads turn and lattes spill when that same opinion comes from across the water. It’s our endearing lack of self confidence and charming...

Is Nick Smith Minister for Magic?

Blog entry by Gen Toop | February 27, 2017

It seems the critical issue of clean swimmable water for New Zealanders has passed into the realms of magical realism. Minister for Magic, Nick Smith waved his blue wand and wadeable rivers miraculously turned into ones you can swim...

Don't get freaked by the eco

Blog entry by Phil Vine | February 25, 2017

Funny how, over time, crazy weird becomes the new normal. There were certainly some nutty ideas floating around when I was a young fella studying Agricultural Economics at Lincoln University last millennium. Outlandish thoughts like...

Neonicotinoids: A serious threat for flower-hopping life-bringers and many more animals

Blog entry by Anne Valette | January 16, 2017

At this point most people know about neonicotinoids and the serious risk they pose to honey bees. Bees are a link in a chain of biodiversity and pollination of incredible value to our food production. Up to 75% of our crops directly...

Seeing is believing: Growing food for people, with people and with nature in Cuba

Blog entry by Reyes Tirado | January 16, 2017

“Ojos hacen fe.” Those are the words of Lucy Martín, an inspiring Cuban researcher with Oxfam in Havana. She has lived through decades of change in Cuba, while remaining grounded in the reality of farmers there. She uses...

9 incredible feats of people power that happened in 2016

Blog entry by Shuk-Wah Chung | December 30, 2016

The Indigenous and environmental rights movement was stronger than ever... This year proved that when real life  David and Goliath battles happen , word spreads, people listen, the truth eventually comes out, and the  movement...

Breaching environmental boundaries: UN report on resource limits

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | October 25, 2016

This summer, the United Nations International Resource Panel (IRP), published 'Global Material Flows and Resource Productivity', a report that admits what ecologists have been saying for decades: resources are limited, human...

The Hawke’s Bay elections and the Ruataniwha Dam

Blog entry by Kathy Cumming | October 10, 2016

“ It can be argued that voters in the Hawke's Bay Regional Council elections voted emphatically against the proposed Ruataniwha Dam .” So read the editorial in Sunday’s Hawke’s Bay Today. A 5-4 pro-dam majority on the old...

With friends like these....what’s an environment to do?

Blog entry by Kathy Cumming | September 29, 2016

The Department of Conservation describes itself as “the Government agency charged with conserving New Zealand’s natural heritage”. Which is why New Zealanders are scratching their heads over the department’s decision to fight a...

Let’s make it a green peace

Blog entry by Bunny McDiarmid | September 21, 2016

Today (21 September), around the globe, we mark Peace Day knowing that for many, peace is nowhere to be found. Not today. And unless things change dramatically, not any time soon. 2015 saw the number of refugees and displaced people...

Here’s why we took the site office at the proposed Ruataniwha Dam for a 100km road trip

Blog entry by Genevieve Toop | September 13, 2016

Early this morning, we travelled to the proposed site of the Ruataniwha irrigation dam in Hawke’s Bay. With a small crane we uplifted the construction site office, put it on the back of a truck and drove it 100kms to Napier.  There we...

Ruataniwha dam down but not out… yet

Blog entry by Genevieve Toop | September 9, 2016

The proposed Ruataniwha Dam is the poster child of Big Irrigation.   It stands as a symbol of the Government's agenda to prop up industrial dairying despite the fact that it’s poisoning our waterways and indebting farmers. ...

Is there a dirty big irrigation scheme planned near you?

Blog entry by Madeleine Smith | September 2, 2016

In the last two weeks, one third of people in Havelock North have fallen ill with a gastro illness that originated in the town’s water supply. The source? Most likely contamination from cows, sheep or deer. By all accounts the...

Ruataniwha looks dead in the dirty water

Blog entry by Gen Toop | August 31, 2016

It’s been a tough few weeks for think-big irrigation and industrial agriculture. As a bit of background for those not familiar with plans for even more industrial dairying around New Zealand - the Government is throwing over ...

Havelock, water and Ruataniwha - it's time to join the dots

Blog entry by Genevieve Toop | August 24, 2016

In the last two weeks, roughly 4500 adults and children have been struck down with a waterborne gastro illness found in Havelock North’s water supply. That’s a third of the town’s entire population. Most likely source? Ruminant...

Drought is real… but dams and irrigation are not the answer

Blog entry by Genevieve Toop | July 26, 2016

There’s no question about it -  drought is causing serious problems for our farmers and communities. So what do we do about it? Dams and irrigation are often touted as the best way to deal with increasing dry spells,...

Too many holes in dam scheme

Blog entry by Gen Toop | June 24, 2016

Dodgy Ruataniwha Dam will destroy rivers and indebt farmers The Ruataniwha dam is one of the largest irrigation schemes planned in New Zealand.  If it goes ahead it will create more industrial dairy farms and pollute the rivers in...

Budget 2016: If you don’t laugh you’ll cry.

Blog entry by Russel Norman | May 27, 2016

This budget shows that the Government’s fossil-fuel driven extractive industry based economic strategy is a slow moving train-wreck. After proclaiming in previous years that industrial dairy, coal, and oil would be the economic...

Panama Papers: The plot thickens

Blog entry by Nick Young | May 10, 2016

Back in April, the Panama Papers rocked the world, exposing just how the global elite use offshore trusts in tax havens such as the British Virgin Islands, Panama and the Bahamas to hide their wealth and dodgy deals. Thanks to an...

5 helpful vegetarian diet tips for meat-free newbies

Blog entry by Rashini Suriyaarachchi | May 8, 2016

Cutting back on red meat and dairy  can be one of the biggest steps to reduce your carbon footprint. While Greenpeace campaign for renewable energy and a transition from fossil fuels, we're also looking at other ways we can protect...

Ecological bankruptcy

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | May 6, 2016

There may not be a single large-scale industry or multi-national corporation on Earth that is genuinely profitable if they had to account for their ecological impact. A recent UN-supported report shows that the world's 3,000 largest...

Why Piss is the Problem With Industrial Dairying in New Zealand

Blog entry by Gen Toop | May 2, 2016

It’s pretty obvious that letting cows wander into waterways, collapsing stream banks and defecating in the water is not good for our rivers. But the most serious freshwater health issue facing NZ’s waterways still involves cows but...

Ecological Farming - Farming for the Future

Blog entry by Gen Toop | April 27, 2016

Industrial dairying is failing. It’s failing people who want to swim in clean rivers, its failing our tourism industry, it’s failing our climate, and it’s failing farmers. The good news is that there are alternative ways to produce...

EU bows to US pressure to open door to new GMOs

Blog entry by Franziska Achterberg | April 26, 2016

People in Europe have massively rejected GMOs, and our governments have started to ban their cultivation , but agro­chemical companies have cooked up a new way to get GMOs onto the European market. They are claiming that GMOs which...

7 things you can do for the planet this Earth Day

Blog entry by Dawn Bickett | April 22, 2016

More than 45 years ago – on the very first Earth Day – tens of millions of people decided to  do something  about environmental destruction. They rallied against pollution, oil spills, pesticides and deforestation… issues that continue...

New Zealand’s clean rivers damned by industrial dairying

Blog entry by Gen Toop | April 15, 2016

Industrial dairying is failing. It’s failing people who want to swim in clean rivers, its failing our tourism industry, it’s failing our climate, and it’s failing farmers. The high input industrial dairying model requires more...

From fridge to film - the farmers choosing a sustainable life

Blog entry by Shuk-Wah Chung | April 11, 2016

They catch the fish you eat and harvest the rice you stir-fry. But there’s something that sets these farmers apart. They’ve taken on farming methods that have influenced the way they think about food and changed their way of life. ...

Big news for bees

Blog entry by Luís Ferreirim | February 9, 2016

As ecological farming and the market for organic food continues to grow across the globe, I’m heartened to see that the same is true in Spain, my home country, where we are going through one of the worst economic crises in recent...

What do over 5 million cows + relaxed environmental regulations equal?

Blog entry by Genevieve Toop | February 3, 2016

Answer? A fresh water crisis. Gone are the days of Aussies telling Kiwi sheep jokes. In the past 20 years, sheep,  pine trees and shrub have made way for more and more cows,  mostly for intensive dairying.   At the same time our...

Tell Auckland Transport to shove it up their berms

Blog entry by Kamal Sunker | October 28, 2015

I can relate to Dan. Like most of the inner-city dwelling 20-somethings, I had no idea what a berm was. That was until I found out that Auckland Transport was taking away the rights of ratepayers to cultivate roadside gardens. To me...

This is the impact of our daily life on the planet

Blog entry by Rashini Suriyaarachchi | June 7, 2015

Every day, we all make choices that impact our local area, country, and the world at large. It can be hard to make the link between your favourite chocolate treat and deforestation in Indonesia – but when you zoom out a little, the...

When industrial food fails us, it's time to change the food system

Blog entry by Alessandro Saccoccio | May 19, 2015

The current food system is broken. We all see how industrial and chemical intensive food production impacts on people and farmers, the planet and animals. For example, did you know that in 2007, 269 tonnes of pesticides were used...

2013: The Year In Photos

Blog entry by Feature Story | January 6, 2014

The year 2013 has been very eventful for Greenpeace on all points of the compass. Whether it be turning around a cargo container filled with fin whale meat in Hamburg, getting the palm oil industry to think twice about deforestation in...

Monsanto confirms GE retreat from Europe

Blog entry by Luís Ferreirim | July 23, 2013

What had been brewing for weeks following various hints and tips was finally confirmed last week when Monsanto announced it would cease the marketing of new genetically engineered seeds (GE) in the European Union. The world's...

Creative forces behind environmentalism, lit by the Mediterranean sun

Blog entry by Arin de Hoog | June 24, 2013

Cannes and Greenpeace; not normally two things you'd link together. This year, however, Greenpeace made its presence known as the Southern French town glitzed and glamoured its way through summer film and media festivals. Greenpeace...

Experts dismay at Key's attack on the RMA

Blog entry by Nathan Argent | May 27, 2013

Good, clean and smart economic policy must be based on good, sensible environmental safeguards. It’s the only way we can look forward to a more prosperous future. Yet John Key’s government, under the guidance of economic hatchet man...

EU bans three bee-killer pesticides: a light of hope for bees and agriculture

Blog entry by Matthias Wüthrich | May 6, 2013

The next time you see a bee buzzing around, it’s worthwhile remembering that much of the food we eat depends significantly on pollination these insects provide. But bees and other pollinators are declining globally, particularly in...

Bhutan goes organic: a lesson for us all?

Blog entry by Pat C | February 19, 2013

By banning the sales of pesticides and herbicides Bhutan has outlined a clear path for the future of its agriculture: it will become the first wholly organic country in the world. Bhutan was already largely organic, but the recent...

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