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Mike Smith

Mike Smith is a veteran Maori rights campaigner from the Far North who is currently campaigning on preventing deep water oil drilling in Aotearoa New Zealand's marine area.

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  • A view from Waitangi by Mike Smith

    Blogpost by Mike Smith - February 3, 2017 at 20:51

     Over the last couple of days I’ve been getting calls from friends, colleagues and media organisations wanting to know what was happening at Waitangi this year.

    Here’s what I’ve been telling them. 

    Depending on your point of view, Waitangi day is either a day of celebrations, a day of rage against the government or, for the majority on NZers, a day off work to enjoy a long summer weekend.

    All of these aspects come together at Waitangi on Waitangi day.

    The Navy provides a bit of pomp and ceremony backed up by the frigates firing their guns out in the bay. The Government provides some bouncy castles and other family friendly activities and entertainment across the bridge at the Treaty grounds.

    Meanwhile at the “bottom” marae, the local elders and community welcome and feed the thousands ... Read more >

  • It's time to push Statoil out for good

    Blogpost by Mike Smith - October 18, 2016 at 11:19

    On Friday last week, New Zealand woke to the news that Norwegian oil giant, Statoil, was pulling the plug on its operations in Northland’s Reinga Basin.

    Although the company’s representatives were quick to claim the move came as a result of the low a probability of finding oil there, the sudden exit follows years of protest by the Northland community.

    The movement in Northland spread like wildfire to the rest of the country, and for the past five years, hikoi and protest against New Zealand’s destructive oil agenda have culminated with a bang at the Government-supported annual petroleum conference in Auckland.

    Each year, thousands upon thousands of have peacefully and defiantly descended en mass to the yearly petroleum conference, chanting and carrying placards with messages like: “Statoil, Go... Read more >

  • It’s said that in war the first casualty is the truth. Increasingly this is now the case in politics and economics as well.

    Over the last week or so we’ve witnessed Te Ohu kaimoana crying crocodile tears over the “removal of Maori Treaty rights”.
     
    And sadly many are buying into this bullshit.
     
    Let’s back the truck up a bit ...
     
    Back in 1989 the government began hatching a plan to subvert legitimate Maori authority over the country's fisheries.
     
    The origins of Maori authority are fundamentally sourced in the principal of “mana tuku iho” (mana that originates from the atua and is handed down through the generations.)
     
    This authority was subsequently acknowledged and protected by Te Tiriti o Waitangi:
     
    "Ko te Kuini o Ingarani ka wakarite ka wakaae ki nga Rangitira ki nga hapu – ki nga tangata katoa... Read more >

  • Friendship forged in the crucible of action

    Blogpost by Mike Smith - August 9, 2016 at 9:53

    This blog was written to mark International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples.

    Greenpeace campaigner Steve Abel greets Elvis Teddy with a traditional hongi, a traditional Maori greeting, as the Greenpeace crew of the new Rainbow Warrior meet Te Whanau a Apanui (Maori tribe) at Whangaparaoa, East Cape to celebrate the withdrawal oil giant Petrobras which had planned to drill for deep sea oil. Elvis Teddy, who skippered the San Pietro fishing boat, was arrested by police during the protest.

    Greenpeace campaigner Steve Abel greets Elvis Teddy with a hongi, a traditional Maori greeting, as the Greenpeace crew of the new Rainbow Warrior meet Te Whanau a Apanui at Whangaparaoa, East Cape to celebrate the withdrawal oil giant Petrobras which had planned to drill for deep sea oil. Elvis Teddy, who skippered the San Pietro fishing boat, was arrested by police during the protest.

    Kia ora my name is Mike. I am a Maori member of the northern tribes of the far north territories of Aotearoa - New Zealand. I’ve been an indigenous rights activist for most of my adult life. During the 1980’s through to the 90’s together with many others, I was engaged in the struggle to correct historical and contemporary ... Read more >

  • Seismic testing for oil in the Arctic Barents Sea, commissioned by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate has been stopped one month ahead of schedule 4 days after Greenpeace exposed it to the media.

    But off the coast of Northland in New Zealand waters, Norwegian oil giant Statoil is due to begin seismic mapping to find oil this summer.

    Seismic mapping is the first step of oil exploration. Before the oil rigs even arrive, before the drills go in the seabed, companies must first determine where to find the oil.

    Seismic tests are done from a ship at the surface. An air gun shoots low-frequency sound pulses that penetrate the seafloor and the reflected sound waves are then recorded by sensors dragged on long cables after the ship. The data collected is used to map the seafloor so that oil co... Read more >

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