Nomadic Penan leader Along Sega and his grandchild examine a tree stump near their village in the Sungai Nyakit area of the Sarawak rainforest in Malaysia. He is 60, a father of nine and grandfather of 30.

Throughout the world, ancient forests are in crisis. Many of the plants and animals that live in these forests face extinction. And many of the people and cultures who depend on these forests for their way of life are also under threat. But the news is not all bad. There is a last chance to protect these forests and the life they support.The world's ancient forests are truly diverse. They include boreal, temperate and tropical forests, coniferous and broadleaf forests, rainforests and mangroves. Together they maintain environmental systems that are essential for life on Earth. They influence weather by controlling rainfall and evaporation of water from soil. They help stabilise the world's climate by storing large amounts of carbon that would otherwise contribute to climate change.

These ancient forests are home to millions of forest people who depend on them for their survival - both physically and spiritually.

These forests also house around two-thirds of the world's land-based species of plants and animals. That's hundreds of thousands of different plants and animals, and literally millions of insects - their futures also depend on the ancient forests.

These magnificent ancient forests are under threat. More than 87 human cultures have been lost in Brazil alone; in the next 10 to 20 years, the world looks set to lose thousands of species of plants and animals. But there is a last chance to SAVE these forests and the people and species that depend on them.

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Life on Earth is inconceivable without trees

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | February 9, 2012

Many of us are familiar with the catchphrase "what happens in Boracay stays in Boracay." Besides the issue of environmental degradation of that island, we believe the same could also apply to Baguio, which has been dubbed as the...

Politicians Listen to the Polluters at UN climate talks

Feature story | December 11, 2011 at 17:27

UN climate talks in Durban have ended the same way they began, in failure. Governments at the UN climate talks have chosen to listen to the polluters over the people and failed to reinforce previous climate saving measures and have steered clear...

Durban Climate Talks: Last chance for the US

Feature story | November 27, 2011 at 12:30

On the eve of the latest round of climate talks in Durban, Greenpeace declares that it is time for our governments to listen to the people, and not the polluters.

You can close our office, but you can’t stop us

Blog entry by Nur Hidayati, Greenpeace Indonesia | November 11, 2011

We have  been warned that we may have to move out of our office in Jakarta early next week. This is the office that has been leading our campaign to stop Asia Pulp and Paper destroying the rainforests of Indonesia . But, in...

Asia Pulp and Paper's sinking reputation forces more companies to jump ship -...

Blog entry by Jamie Woolley, Greenpeace UK | November 2, 2011

There's further bad news for Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) as yet more companies around the world ditch their contracts with the unscrupulous forest-trashing company. Hot on the heels of Mattel and Lego, today Hasbro announced a new...

Success: Barbie and Mattel drop deforestation!

Blog entry by Laura Kenyon, Greenpeace International | October 5, 2011

We all know that break ups are hard. Especially when they involve secrets – like the shameful secret that broke up Barbie and Ken back in June: she had destroyed rainforest in her toy packaging. Her manufacturer, Mattel, was using...

How the toy sector and APP are responding to our Indonesia forest campaign

Blog entry by Zulfahmi | June 14, 2011

It’s been a busy few days since the latest phase of our campaign to stop deforestation in Indonesia got underway. There are now signs that both Mattel and Lego are preparing to make changes in the way they buy their packaging. ...

Uninspired implementation of environmental laws hinders SEA from leading the world in...

Blog entry by JP Agcaoili | June 8, 2011

ASEAN member states could be the world leaders in sustainable development.  We could be the prime example of how the protection of our natural resources benefits not just the world, but contributes largely as well to national progress...

Nestlé needs to give rainforests a break

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | March 18, 2010 6 comments

Need a break? Before you have one with a Kit Kat watch this video – ' Have a break? ' We need your help to get the rainforests a break and to help you spread the word we’ve launched this video spoof. It exposes the true cost behind...

Nestlé drives rainforest destruction pushing orang-utans to brink of extinction

Feature story | March 18, 2010 at 7:00

Nestlé is using palm oil from destroyed Indonesian rainforests and peatlands, in products like KitKat, pushing already endangered orang-utans to the brink of extinction and accelerating climate change, a new Greenpeace report reveals. (1)

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