Nomadic Penan leader Along Sega and his grandchild examine a tree stump near their village in the Sungai Nyakit area of the Sarawak rainforest in Malaysia. He is 60, a father of nine and grandfather of 30.

Throughout the world, ancient forests are in crisis. Many of the plants and animals that live in these forests face extinction. And many of the people and cultures who depend on these forests for their way of life are also under threat. But the news is not all bad. There is a last chance to protect these forests and the life they support.The world's ancient forests are truly diverse. They include boreal, temperate and tropical forests, coniferous and broadleaf forests, rainforests and mangroves. Together they maintain environmental systems that are essential for life on Earth. They influence weather by controlling rainfall and evaporation of water from soil. They help stabilise the world's climate by storing large amounts of carbon that would otherwise contribute to climate change.

These ancient forests are home to millions of forest people who depend on them for their survival - both physically and spiritually.

These forests also house around two-thirds of the world's land-based species of plants and animals. That's hundreds of thousands of different plants and animals, and literally millions of insects - their futures also depend on the ancient forests.

These magnificent ancient forests are under threat. More than 87 human cultures have been lost in Brazil alone; in the next 10 to 20 years, the world looks set to lose thousands of species of plants and animals. But there is a last chance to SAVE these forests and the people and species that depend on them.

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Annual Report 2015

Publication | November 17, 2016 at 15:27

Greenpeace Southeast Asia was founded in 2000 in response to rampant environmental degradation brought about by unfettered development in the region.

Licence to kill

Publication | October 22, 2013 at 11:00

As few as 400 tigers are thought to remain in the rainforests of Sumatra, which are vanishing at a staggering rate – a quarter of a million hectares every year. Expansion of oil palm and pulpwood plantations was responsible for nearly two-thirds...

Certifying Destruction

Publication | September 3, 2013 at 11:00

Oil palm plantations are the largest driver of deforestation in Indonesia.

A Good Treaty for Forests at Copenhagen

Publication | November 25, 2009 at 8:00

Tropical forest destruction is responsible for about a fifth of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions – more than emission from all the world’s cars, planes, and trains put together. Consequently, stopping forest destruction is one of the...

Food Security and Climate Change: The answer is biodiversity

Publication | September 2, 2009 at 8:00

A review of scientific publications on climate change adaptation in agriculture.

Greenpeace Policy on Saving Forests to Protect the Climate

Publication | March 1, 2009 at 8:00

Protecting ancient forests is crucial to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases, preserve global biodiversity, and protect the livelihoods of millions of forest peoples. Tropical forest destruction is responsible for approximately one...

Kayu Lapis Indonesia: the untouchable God of Indonesian ancient forest destruction

Publication | April 21, 2006 at 16:48

This crime file focusses on logging companies such as Kayu Lapis Indonesia, which operate with total disregard of Indonesia’s logging laws. Companies like this are destroying Indonesia’s ancient forests at an alarming rate.

Protect Life on Earth today

Publication | January 18, 2004 at 8:00

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