Big-eyed jacks found inside the no-take fish sanctuary of the Apo Island Marine reserve.

There is a growing body of scientific evidence that demonstrates that the establishment of large-scale networks of marine reserves, urgently needed to protect marine species and their habitats, could be key to reversing global fisheries decline.

Marine reserves can benefit adjacent fisheries from both the 'spillover' of adult and juvenile fish beyond the reserve boundaries and through the export of eggs and larvae. Inside the reserves, populations increase in size and individuals live longer, grow larger and develop increased reproductive potential.

Marine reserves could even benefit highly migratory species, such as sharks, tuna and billfish, if reserves were created in places where they are currently highly vulnerable, such as nursery grounds, spawning sites or aggregation sites such as seamounts.

Large-scale marine reserves are areas that are closed to all extractive uses, such as fishing and mining, as well as disposal activities. Within these areas there may be core zones where no human activities are allowed, for instance areas that act as scientific reference areas or areas where there are particularly sensitive habitats or species.

Some areas within the coastal zone may be opened to small-scale, non-destructive fisheries providing that these are sustainable, within ecological limits, and have been decided upon with the full participation of affected local communities.

Marine Reserves (MRs) are not just about overfishing -even if one of the primary reasons for creating MRs is preserving fish stocks. They are increasingly seen as an essential global tool to protect the marine environment, including from pollution -caused particularly by the disposal of wastes (radioactive wastes, munitions and carbon dioxide).

                     

 The Apo Island Marine Reserve is a very good example of how marine reserves can benefit communities. clcik on the arrows to see more of the Apo Island Marine Reserve.

The latest updates

 

Illegal fishing: what happens at sea too often stays at sea

Blog entry by Sari Tolvanen | February 27, 2013

The problem of illegal fishing is enormous and Greenpeace has been working hard to combat illegal fishing for many years, as we try to protect our oceans and ensure future generations have fish and fishing jobs.  We have sent ships...

8 reasons why Shell can't be trusted in the Arctic

Blog entry by Franziska | January 4, 2013

Shell's  most recent 'mishap'  a few days ago was not the first setback the oil giant has suffered in its plans to drill for oil in the Arctic. In fact, it's the eighth in a growing list of reasons why Shell should not be trusted in...

Esperanza arrives in Davao

Image gallery | December 11, 2012

More boats and more fishing will end up in empty plates and empty future

Blog entry by Apple Chow | December 6, 2012 1 comment

Fishing is not quite what it used to be. Even in the Pacific where images of sunny shores, palm tress and little canoes may prevail, reality underneath the waves is quite something else. Some of the biggest and most powerful fishing...

It's simple: Ban the FAD

Blog entry by Duncan Williams | December 5, 2012

Philippines is a great country. " It’s more fun in the Philippines " is an aptly coined slogan for its tourism campaign. Greenpeace put that slogan to the test this morning with an impromptu activity aimed at delivering a similar...

IUU Report Illegal Transshipment

Publication | December 1, 2012 at 17:37

Greenpeace conducted an expedition in the waters of Palau and the Pacific High Seas Pocket 1, the area of international waters between the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) of Palau, Federated States of Micronesia and Papua New Guinea (2). This is...

SIGN

You have the power to protect our oceans!

Pacific must solidify their position to save its ocean

Blog entry by Navi Tuivuniwai | November 29, 2012

The annual meeting of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is scheduled to kick start in Manila, Philippines on December 2, 2012. On board the MY Esperanza, we’ve just completed the last leg of the  “Defending...

Help end overfishing

Image gallery | November 29, 2012

Ocean Defender Ship Tour

Feature story | November 28, 2012 at 14:10

Greenpeace ship MY Esperanza is in the final part of the "Save our Oceans Asia Pacific Tour" after visiting South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Palau, and is now en route to Manila for the upcoming Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission...

SIGN

You have the power to protect our oceans!

71 - 80 of 321 results.

Categories