Big-eyed jacks found inside the no-take fish sanctuary of the Apo Island Marine reserve.

There is a growing body of scientific evidence that demonstrates that the establishment of large-scale networks of marine reserves, urgently needed to protect marine species and their habitats, could be key to reversing global fisheries decline.

Marine reserves can benefit adjacent fisheries from both the 'spillover' of adult and juvenile fish beyond the reserve boundaries and through the export of eggs and larvae. Inside the reserves, populations increase in size and individuals live longer, grow larger and develop increased reproductive potential.

Marine reserves could even benefit highly migratory species, such as sharks, tuna and billfish, if reserves were created in places where they are currently highly vulnerable, such as nursery grounds, spawning sites or aggregation sites such as seamounts.

Large-scale marine reserves are areas that are closed to all extractive uses, such as fishing and mining, as well as disposal activities. Within these areas there may be core zones where no human activities are allowed, for instance areas that act as scientific reference areas or areas where there are particularly sensitive habitats or species.

Some areas within the coastal zone may be opened to small-scale, non-destructive fisheries providing that these are sustainable, within ecological limits, and have been decided upon with the full participation of affected local communities.

Marine Reserves (MRs) are not just about overfishing -even if one of the primary reasons for creating MRs is preserving fish stocks. They are increasingly seen as an essential global tool to protect the marine environment, including from pollution -caused particularly by the disposal of wastes (radioactive wastes, munitions and carbon dioxide).

                     

 The Apo Island Marine Reserve is a very good example of how marine reserves can benefit communities. clcik on the arrows to see more of the Apo Island Marine Reserve.

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Ocean Defender Ship Tour

Feature story | November 28, 2012 at 14:10

Greenpeace ship MY Esperanza is in the final part of the "Save our Oceans Asia Pacific Tour" after visiting South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Palau, and is now en route to Manila for the upcoming Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission...

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A day in the life of Geneviva

Blog entry by Cristina Nitafan | November 26, 2012

On board the African Queen, one of MY Esperanza ’s inflatable boats, we approached GENEVIVA, a purse seine fishing vessel from the Philippines. As we got nearer, the crew from the ship gave their genuine smiles and even gave us a hand...

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Blog entry by Wansiri Rongrongmuang | November 23, 2012

Vast indigo ocean, endless blue sky with different shades of clouds and a small group of determined people wanting to change something, here I am in the middle of the Pacific Ocean with Greenpeace. It was almost like I used my...

Etching the Pacific ‘Storyboard’ of our Oceanic Realm

Blog entry by Seni Nabou | November 20, 2012

One of the first delights I first discovered when I first visited Palau in mid-2000 was that  similar to Papua New Guinea , storyboards – carvings etched in wooden slabs depicting stories / myths / legends – were also a  traditional...

The 'Vergene' Purse Seiner

Image gallery | November 17, 2012

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Image gallery | November 16, 2012

Rescuing the Pacific and its Tuna

Publication | November 14, 2012 at 15:22

Delivering the Pacific Commons Marine Reserves

Time is running out for tuna

Blog entry by Chow Yuen Ping | November 12, 2012

Sailing with the ship, flying with a helicopter, diving in the middle of the sea, I am on the journey of defending the Pacific Ocean. I have been working on a campaign to help Pacific tuna to recover for more than 3 years, yet...

Defend our oceans

Feature story | November 8, 2012 at 16:05

There’s more to the sea than the endless stretch of blue water. This vast global ocean pulses around our world driving the natural forces which maintain life on our planet. And beneath the waves, the ocean is also pulsing with life—a staggering...

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The Esperanza's back in the Pacific

Blog entry by Farah Obaidullah | November 6, 2012

The sun has just set on my first day back on board the Greenpeace ship, the Esperanza. It’s been six years since I last sailed on the Esperanza for our Pacific fisheries campaign and I am glad to see how much...

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