EXTREME WEATHER EVENTS: A climate of tragedy in the Philippines

Feature story - December 2, 2006
Greenpeace lamented the loss of lives and the extensive devastation wrought by super-typhoon Reming (international code name Durian) in parts of the Philippines, stressing that the latest extreme weather disturbance to hit the country is a portent of more violent weather events that countries around the world are likely to experience in the future as a consequence of climate change.

A house lies in shambles after Typhoon Reming triggered a landslide on the slopes of Mayon volcano in Albay, Philippines, 340 kilometers southeast of Manila. Greenpeace lamented the loss of lives and extensive devastation wrought by supertyphoon Reming (International code name Durian) in parts of the Philippines, stressing that the latest extreme weather disturbace to hit the country is a portent of more violent weather events that countries around the world are likely to experience in the future as a consequence of climate change.

A man takes stock of his remaining belongings after Typhoon Reming triggered a landslide on the slopes of Mayon volcano in Albay, Philippines, 340 kilometers southeast of Manila. Greenpeace lamented the loss of lives and extensive devastation wrought by supertyphoon Reming (International code name Durian) in parts of the Philippines, stressing that the latest extreme weather disturbace to hit the country is a portent of more violent weather events that countries around the world are likely to experience in the future as a consequence of climate change.

Children walk on a road seemingly unmindful of the devastation wrought by strong winds and rain from Typhoon Reming battered Legazpi in Albay, Philippines, 340 kilometers southeast of Manila. Greenpeace lamented the loss of lives and extensive devastation wrought by supertyphoon Reming (International code name Durian) in parts of the Philippines, stressing that the latest extreme weather disturbace to hit the country is a portent of more violent weather events that countries around the world are likely to experience in the future as a consequence of climate change.

Houses by a collapsed river bank lie in shambles after strong winds and rain from Typhoon Reming battered Legazpi in Albay, Philippines, 340 kilometers southeast of Manila. Greenpeace lamented the loss of lives and extensive devastation wrought by supertyphoon Reming (International code name Durian) in parts of the Philippines, stressing that the latest extreme weather disturbace to hit the country is a portent of more violent weather events that countries around the world are likely to experience in the future as a consequence of climate change.

Part of a bridge has been swept into a river after strong winds and rain from Typhoon Reming battered Legazpi in Albay, Philippines, 340 kilometers southeast of Manila. Greenpeace lamented the loss of lives and extensive devastation wrought by supertyphoon Reming (International code name Durian) in parts of the Philippines, stressing that the latest extreme weather disturbace to hit the country is a portent of more violent weather events that countries around the world are likely to experience in the future as a consequence of climate change.

A truck tries to pass through a road that collapsed into a river after strong winds and rain from Typhoon Reming battered Legazpi in Albay, Philippines, 340 kilometers southeast of Manila. Greenpeace lamented the loss of lives and extensive devastation wrought by supertyphoon Reming (International code name Durian) in parts of the Philippines, stressing that the latest extreme weather disturbace to hit the country is a portent of more violent weather events that countries around the world are likely to experience in the future as a consequence of climate change.

A woman inspects the remains of her house in Albay, Philippines, 340 kilometers southeast of Manila. Greenpeace lamented the loss of lives and extensive devastation wrought by supertyphoon Reming (International code name Durian) in parts of the Philippines, stressing that the latest extreme weather disturbace to hit the country is a portent of more violent weather events that countries around the world are likely to experience in the future as a consequence of climate change.

A doorway lies half buried in mud after Typhoon Reming triggered a landslide on the slopes of Mayon volcano in Albay, Philippines, 340 kilometers southeast of Manila. Greenpeace lamented the loss of lives and extensive devastation wrought by supertyphoon Reming (International code name Durian) in parts of the Philippines, stressing that the latest extreme weather disturbace to hit the country is a portent of more violent weather events that countries around the world are likely to experience in the future as a consequence of climate change.

A man walks by a house destroyed by floods and mud brought on by Typhoon Reming in Albay, Philippines, 340 kilometers southeast of Manila. Greenpeace lamented the loss of lives and extensive devastation wrought by supertyphoon Reming (International code name Durian) in parts of the Philippines, stressing that the latest extreme weather disturbace to hit the country is a portent of more violent weather events that countries around the world are likely to experience in the future as a consequence of climate change.

"The tragic loss of lives and the massive destruction of properties brought about by the super-typhoon deserves immediate attention and sympathy from the international community. It should also serve as a wake-up call about the need for governments to find ways to avert or mitigate the catastrophic impacts of extreme weather events which scientists predict could become more severe because of climate change. We are calling on governments worldwide to act decisively and urgently on climate change because it is poor countries like the Philippines who bear much of the brunt from such climate impacts," said Abigail Jabines, Climate and Energy campaigner  for Greenpeace Southeast Asia.

Reming is also the third super-typhoon this year--a first in Philippine history--and the fourth major typhoon in as many months. Typhoon Milenyo (international code name Xangsane), struck the country in September, causing more than P3 billion in damages and leaving more than a hundred casualties. Super-typhoons, Paeng (Cimaron) and Queenie (Chebi) followed in October and November, both adding millions of pesos more to the damages already wrought by Milenyo.

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