Endangered Water, Endangered Lives: Water pollution featured in Greenpeace photo exhibit

Feature story - April 2, 2008
Greenpeace opened a photo exhibit today to visualize and highlight the worrying trends of water pollution in Thailand. Captured in the photo exhibit "Endangered Water, Endangered Lives" in CentralWorld are images of water scarcity and pollution coming from industrial and household discharges, and indiscriminate waste management practices.

Greenpeace opened a photo exhibit to visualize and highlight the worrying trends of water pollution in Thailand. Captured in the photo exhibit "Endangered Water,Endangered lives" in Central World are images of water scarcity and pollution coming from industrial and household discharges,and indiscriminate waste management practices.

Greenpeace opened a photo exhibit to visualize and highlight the worrying trends of water pollution in Thailand. Captured in the photo exhibit "Endangered Water,Endangered lives" in Central World are images of water scarcity and pollution coming from industrial and household discharges,and indiscriminate waste management practices.

Greenpeace opened a photo exhibit to visualize and highlight the worrying trends of water pollution in Thailand. Captured in the photo exhibit "Endangered Water,Endangered lives" in Central World are images of water scarcity and pollution coming from industrial and household discharges,and indiscriminate waste management practices.

Suwit Khunkitti, Deputy Prime Minister and the Minister of Industry, officially opened the photo exhibit and used the opportunity to declare the Ministry's tougher policy to curb pollution from industries.

According to Greenpeace, Thailand now faces the prospects of a serious water crisis in the face of the continued deterioration of the quality of water resources across the country. A recent Greenpeace-ABAC Poll survey shows that as much as 86.5% of urban Thai people consider water pollution a serious environmental problem.

"We have the least quantity of fresh water resources available per person in Southeast Asia. In the face of projected increases in water demand, as well as the anticipated impacts of climate change on water availability, it is important that we do our best to protect our limited water resources from pollution," said Ply Pirom, Toxics Campaigner for Greenpeace Southeast Asia.

The images from the Photo exhibit show that the problem of water scarcity now occurs in many areas.  Many images also highlight dirty water caused by industrial discharges and indiscriminate garbage disposal. The presentation gives raise to concerns that if the current trend continues, the country will inevitably face a severe water crisis which with profound impacts on the lives of the people, especially the poor.

Greenpeace also used the exhibit as an opportunity to present solutions to the problem of pollution beginning with the industrial sector whose heavy use of chemicals and toxic substances in various production processes has been a significant source of water pollution.  Industries must strive for clean production, eliminating the use of toxic chemicals in their production processes and replacing them with cleaner and safer substitutes. By doing this, the problem of pollution will be prevented at source and the threats to the integrity of water sources will be minimized.

"What good is economic progress if the people don't have safe and clean water? Clean water is a human right and for the sake of our collective survival, we also call on the public to be vigilant in monitoring and protecting our vital water resources," said Pirom.

"We challenge the Ministry of Industry to take genuine and serious action to stop water pollution by industries. We hope that the Ministry of Industry will itself take the lead in promoting and mainstreaming clean production in the industrial sector. The people expect nothing less," added Pirom.

"Endangered Water, Endangered Lives" photo exhibit is open to the public free of charge from April 1 to April 15, 2008 at CentralWorld 3rd Floor, Eden Zone.

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