Nuclear power in Indonesia, a reckless and dangerous plan

Greenpeace joins local community in World Environment Day protests

Feature story - June 5, 2007
Greenpeace joined thousands of residents of Jepara, community leaders, artists and celebrities in a massive protest against the proposal to build a nuclear power plant in Ujung Lemahabang on the north coast of Java. The protest was organized by MAREM (The Earth’s Guardian Community) on the occasion of World Environment Day.

Greenpeace today joined thousands of residents of Jepara, community leaders, artists and celebrities in a massive protest against the proposal to build a nuclear power plant in Ujung Lemahabang on the north coast of Java. The protest was organized by MAREM (The Earth’s Guardian Community) on the occasion of World Environment Day.

"The proposal of building a nuclear power plant in Indonesia is a reckless and hazardous scheme of vested interests and the dying nuclear industry. It will trap Indonesia in a cycle of dangerous risks and economic debts forever," said Emmy Hafild, Executive Director of Greenpeace Southeast Asia, addressing the massive gathering. "Instead of exploring the enormous renewable energy potential of Indonesia, we are being forced to become a dumping ground for an atrocious technology." she added.

BATAN, Indonesian nuclear energy agency is forging ahead with plans to build its first nuclear power plant in the shadow of a dormant volcano Mount Muria (1,600-metre high) in central Java, despite mounting opposition from environmental groups. Residents fear that a slightest tremor could trigger a fresh eruption and spell disaster for any nuclear reactor in its path. The consequences of a radioactive leak, through earthquake or eruption, could prove disastrous for Java - home to 100 million Indonesians.

Companies in Japan, South Korea and France are vying for the contract to build four proposed 1,000 megawatt reactors. The bidding for construction of the first in Ujung Lemahabang is set to start in two years and it will be commissioned by 2010.

"Nuclear power is not only dangerous it is also prohibitively expensive. Hardly any of the currently 435 commercial nuclear reactors in operation world-wide was built within the planned time frames or budgets, and competitive electricity prices could only be achieved by price regulations, direct and indirect subsidies to the production of nuclear power, and externalizing most environmental costs of uranium mining and fuel production, and heavily subsidizing a large part back end costs. Costs that will be passed on to the Indonesian tax payer," said Nur Hidayati, Greenpeace Climate and Energy campaigner on the occasion.

Get involved!

Join the Energy [R]evolution by signing up as a Greenpeace cyberactivist!

Support us!

Greenpeace depends on your contributions. In order to ensure that we remain an independent voice for the planet, we don't accept corporate or government funds: we rely on the small donations of millions of supporters. Donate today.

Tags